hangover


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hangover

the delayed aftereffects of drinking too much alcohol in a relatively short period of time, characterized by headache and sometimes nausea and dizziness

hangover

[′haŋ‚ō·vər]
(communications)
In television, overlapping and blurring of successive frames opposite to direction of subject motion, due to improper adjustment of transient response.
In facsimile, distortion produced when the signal changes from maximum to minimum conditions at a slower rate than required, resulting in tailing on the lines in the recorded copy.
(medicine)
After effect of excessive intake of alcohol or certain drugs, such as barbiturates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hangover symptoms can be the worst including fatigue, dehydration, a headache or muscle aches, dizziness, shakiness, and even rapid heartbeat.
"We didn't find any truth in the idea that drinking beer before wine gives you a milder hangover than the other way around," said Joran Kochling from Germany's Witten/Herdecke University.
"The truth is that drinking too much of any alcoholic drink is likely to result in a hangover. The only reliable way of predicting how miserable you'll feel the next day is by how drunk you feel and whether you are sick.
Dr Kai Hensel, a senior clinical fellow at Cambridge University and senior author of the study, said: "Unpleasant as hangovers are, we should remember that they do have one important benefit, at least: they are a protective warning sign that will certainly have aided humans over the ages to change their future behaviour.
A BOOZE trial found mixing the grape and the grain makes no difference to hangovers.
Asked about the reasons for conducting the study, he said: "Firstly, a clear result in favour of one particular order could help to reduce hangovers and help many people have a better day after a night out - though we encourage people to drink responsibly.
Not only should you eat up before taking medicine, but having a good, hearty breakfast might help fix your hangover, as well.
Anyone who needs to keep their wits about them and pay attention to a task may find this difficult while experiencing a hangover.
"To answer why a hangover makes us feel so bad we need to separate out the different effects and explain them."
Taking painkillers can prevent a hangover FALSE - Dehydration is a major factor in causing hangovers, so taking painkillers won't help prevent one, said Dr Jarvis.
Pickle juice: Hold your nose and down this is a widely accepted hangover cure.