hard lead


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hard lead

[′härd ¦led]
(metallurgy)
Lead alloy with reduced malleability due to the presence of impurities, usually antimony.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

antimonial lead, hard lead, regulus metal

An alloy containing 10 to 25% antimony and the balance lead; antimony increases the tensile strength and hardens the lead; used in roofing, tank lining, and cladding, 2.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most handguns lend themselves very well to lead bullets because their overall velocity matches the range where hard lead bullets can perform well without leading the bore.
With hard lead shot having a Brinell hardness of 11, bismuth measures about 18 while steel shot registers approximately 110.
A hard lead alloy is used for making BRI bullets that assures adequate penetration.
It is a long hard lead up to this ridge and I managed it without breaking breath, something that I could not have done a year since.
It consists of a 1".45 caliber hard lead slug with a slight hollow point dimple in its nose.
Getting him from where he was to where he is was a very hard lead for Tigger and for myself.
The first thought was that to get a steam engine for Redesmouth Junction to the top of the Wannies, must have required some canny skill on the part of the driver and some great shovelling on the part of the fireman - it is, as they say, a "hard lead".
Use an ordinary hard lead pencil with a well-sharpened point for making the mark on the wall.
Working extra hard leads to exhaustion and consumes personal resources necessary for patience and perspective.
This engagement helps generate referrals, drives traffic to the senior living community's website and contributes to the integrated system of producing hard leads in the form of brochure requests, tour requests and visits.
She also noted that too many producers pursue "hard leads" (acquaintances who are easy to call, but are less likely to agree to an appointment) when they should be devoting time to "easy leads" (family and friends who are hard to approach in a professional capacity, but who also yield higher appointment rates).