hard rot

hard rot

[′härd ‚rät]
(plant pathology)
Any plant disease characterized by lesions with hard surfaces.
A fungus disease of gladiolus caused by Septoria gladioli which produces hard-surfaced lesions on the leaves and corms.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The severity and type of damage lowering the internal quality of log (i.e., color defects and/or decay) were classified into 5 grades: 1 = no damage (no visible color defects or decay); 2 = color defect in pith with a diameter <20 mm (slight color change); 3 = hard rot in pith with a diameter <20 mm (clear color change, usually as a result of chemical reaction or preliminary stage of decay); 4 = hard rot (the wood material dark but still hard, a condition caused by an infection related to a decaying fungus); 5 = soft rot (wood material is dark and soft, and wears away when scratched) (see Schatz et al.
In both species the most common damage type (>50%) was hard rot in pith with a diameter <20 ram; this exceeded or equaled the proportion of no damage (Tables 2 and 3).
Logs were graded to the damage type that most lowered the internal quality (e.g., log with soft rot may also contain hard rot, hard rot in pith, or color defect in pith).