hard rubber


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Related to hard rubber: ebonite

hard rubber

[′härd ¦rəb·ər]
(materials)
Rubber that has been vulcanized at high temperatures and pressures to give hardness; used as an electrical insulating material and in tool handles. Also known as ebonite.
References in periodicals archive ?
* The service life of the hard rubber tracks is expected to be double that of traditional metal tracks.
Some even mix hard rubber sections with soft rubber.
To cover all possible applications, the floats are available in a wide range of materials including stainless steel, Hastelloy[R], PTFE, TFM, aluminium and hard rubber.
For example, papermakers can now use a 5-20 P&J polyurethane roll cover where they are currently using a bone hard rubber or epoxy cover," said Merrion.
(5) investigated the effect of rubber deformability and content on the strain hardening with ABS polymers containing soft and hard rubber of 20 and 40 wt% in uniaxial extension.
hard rubber nipples slip nicely into the red rubber one, creating the
Regent can be ordered with either a soft rubber, hard rubber, TPR, urethane or polyolefin wheel.
The four-inch hard rubber casters stabilize movement over rough, uneven floors.
Two-ply construction combines the resistance to wet chlorine and oxidizing agents of semi-hard or hard rubber with a soft "tie gum." The hard rubbers are considered too brittle for application where wide temperature variations occur, however.
At Zhifeng Shao's lab at the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Charlottesville, researchers have built an AFM that works under freezing conditions in which biological molecules become still and relatively stiff, like hard rubber. At room temperature, biomolecules ordinarily wriggle and writhe, making them the bucking broncos of probe microscopy.
Farley hopes to find a manufacturer to mass-produce his invention, ideally made of inflatable plastic and a hard rubber skin.
The arc of the hard rubber truncheon in a policeman's hand recalls the curve of the sabre in Goya's 2nd of May.' After many such flightenins pictures, the serene portrait of a mother and her children is heartstopping.