hard sell


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hard sell

an aggressive insistent technique of selling or advertising
References in periodicals archive ?
I pre-empted the 'excess insurance' hard sell by explaining I had my own policy and would pay the [euro]1,200 deposit needed.
Keep boredom to a minimum, pack some snacks and try to make sure it's somewhere you know the fish are biting - scenery is a hard sell to someone under 10.
As the newspaper business struggles to survive, journalism would seem to be a hard sell for young people trying to pick a career.
Why America is such a hard sell; beyond pride and prejudice.
Schlesinger and Collingwood prefer dry, understated vocals that wisely shrug off melodrama, realizing that their indelible character studies don't need a hard sell.
But for their customers being charged pounds 30 for a letter, it's a hard sell.
Hopkins points out that her MySpace page (www.myspace.com/nickyjett) attracted a promotions consultant who invited her to sell books in-person at a Chicago event showcasing the work of local authors, "The key to using these sites is to join the community to widen your circle of influence rather than do a hard sell," she says.
"Anything opening up immigration is a hard sell right now, so combining gays with that anti-immigrant bent makes that a very hard issue."
If this sounds like a hard sell, it is: Prayers for the Assassin's "Islamic States of America" has all the scares of an episode of Monster Chiller Horror Theater on story.
Verenzuela says that the urban gardens have been a hard sell. Ninety two percent of Venezuelans live and work in urban centers, and many Caracans scoffed at Chavez's suggestion that barrio residents "raise crops and chickens on their balconies." Verenzuela stressed the fresh and healthy benefits of organic produce, but nearby street vendors say they like the produce because it is cheaper than the grocery store.
It wasn't a hard sell. With over 1100 buildings in the Southeast region AFRT's Chris Lindberg determined that "something will hit us somewhere," and deployed a Jones Lang LaSalle web-based tool called "4Sight" to help protect AFRT's considerable bank assets in the region.
Many great moments in American art have taken us into the heat of competition; generally speaking, however, art that references the world of sports finds its niche at the dead center of mainstream culture, churned out by schlock mills, marketed in "starving artist" sales at airport motels, or, worse yet, sold in "theme art" galleries that specialize in ripping off their clientele with dubious merchandise and hard sell about "investment potential." While young artists (many of them still in graduate school) have recently shown a renewed interest in such "discredited" cultural byproducts as muscle cars and motorbikes, there's one old-timer who could still teach those pups some new tricks.