hard-surface

hard-surface

[′härd ¦sər·fəs]
(civil engineering)
To treat a ground surface in order to prevent muddiness.
(metallurgy)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
There was not even a hard-surface road in the thirteen United States until 1794; nor even a postage stamp until 1847, the year in which Alexander Graham Bell was born.
This dilutes the hard-surfacing material with base metal and reduces its anti-galling properties by contaminating the hard-surface material with iron.
It turns out it should have detected more than 10 of them, if the hard-surface theory is true," Lu said in the statement.
Once they knew what to look for, the team figured out how often this should be seen in the nearby universe, if the hard-surface theory is true.
Applications: Floor finishes and polishes, Hard-surface cleaners
demand for hard-surface flooring is projected to increase by 3.9 percent yearly, reaching 11.9 billion square feet in 2011, which is valued at $13.5 billion, according to a new study by The Freedonia Group Inc., Cleveland.
The Greenhead Road college had originally planned to create a synthetic grass pitch, a hard-surface sports pitch, access ramps and floodlights on land behind its site.
Developed by Lees Carpets as an alternative to hard-surface flooring, NeoFloor[TM] combines the advantages of carpet with the ease of maintenance of hard surfaces.
demand for hard-surface flooring is projected to grow 5.5 percent annually through 2009, according to a new study by The Freedonia Group Inc.
In addition, the polymer provides wipes with reportedly high wet strength, cationic disinfectant compatibility and a durable hard-surface cleaning functionality.
The researchers tracked episodes of worker illness and injury related to five classes of disinfectants: halogens including hypochlorites (bleach and its relatives), quaternary ammonium compounds (hard-surface cleaners that impede bacterial growth at high dilution), phenolic agents (including coal tar disinfectants such as Lysol), products containing pine oils (added more for their "clean" scent than their cleansing properties), and "unspecified" agents (where the identity of the specific disinfectant was not determined).