hardware cloth

hardware cloth

Steel wire-woven screening; usually has a mesh ? to ¾ in. (3.18 to 9.53 mm); commonly galvanized.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have hardware cloth under each bed to shut out moles.
Each garden bed involved digging down two feet to lay hardware cloth (for the gophers), building thick wooden sides (for the rabbits), arching cattle panels over top (for the deer), and wrapping it all in chicken wire (for the quail).
Although it's nontraditional, we chose to use green vinyl-coated hardware cloth to construct our basket simply because we had some small pieces of it on hand.
All that is needed is a piece of half-inch hardware cloth (wire screen) and a certified chimney sweep to install it properly.
The inside of the front panel of the box should be roughed up, or have hardware cloth attached, to aid the young in leaving the box.
Resting atop the squares is a 14-inch square piece of hardware cloth with 1/4" holes.
If rabbits or voles have been a problem, use quarter-inch mesh hardware cloth (wire), and form cylinders of the wire around tree stems.
Sheet metal guards on post tops helped, and some farmers covered the lower side of their cribs with hardware cloth to further deter the pesky little beasties, but some would always find their way in.
Cut the top end out of the barrel, leaving about a 2 inch lip all the way around to support for our hardware cloth floor.
* Find out where rats are getting into your buildings or chicken coop and block the entry points with hardware cloth.
Hardware cloth is ideal for creating the basic structure of walls and planters, similar to the rebar used in concrete work or the two-by-fours used when framing a house.
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