harlequinade


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harlequinade

Theatre a play or part of a pantomime in which harlequin has a leading role
References in periodicals archive ?
The frame of this harlequinade offers a kind of metatheatrical moment, where a poet, contemplating his last shilling, desires to write a tragedy but realizes the unlikelihood of that project bringing him abundant recompense.
In doing Harlequinade which my mom did, she wants me to do it very well kaya I have the pressure of her teaching me what she did and how she wanted it to be done and how I want it to be done.
At the same time these features seem to look back at the pantomime harlequinade and restore something of its original function as portrayed in 1884 by The Saturday Review in which it was lamented of contemporary pantomime that:
Sarah Connolly sings the distraught composer, Orla Boylen sings Ariadne, and Gillian Keith, Zerbinetta the actress, in the harlequinade and musical director Lothar Koenigs conducts.
The most famous and popular of all the clowns in harlequinade and pantomime, Grimaldi was born in London in 1779.
Then a firecracker of a dancer, Dmitry Lysenko, exploded on to the stage with partner Svetlana Bekk, dancing the pas de deux from Harlequinade.
His brand of experimental hip-hop can draw you in with mesmerising belly dancing like on Rag & Bone Beat or blissed out She Binds Books, but just as quickly push you away with the jaw crunching noise of Black Hearted B*** which features Edinburgh MC Harlequinade or The Whisky Fist which samples bootleg tapes of The Jesus and Mary Chain's live noise.
No longer so much a harlequinade exercise in the artist-as-vagabond, de Jong's luridly colored gens du voyage have either fallen foul of the system or taken a last stand, symbolized by the now basketless little girl standing on the barrel once hoisted on an older youth's shoulder, her arms thrown hieratically into the air.
Such a harlequinade of letters poured into the journal from doctors that the editor eventually called a halt.
The elongated concrete cores are linked by taut, horizontal membranes of clear glass and by harlequinade, or chequered, strata of yellow plywood and white glass spandrels.
From the slightly skewed vantage point required by Pirandellian humor, the Nazi-Fascist spectacle of power becomes an exercise in self-satire, a harlequinade absolutely unworthy of the passionate and uncritical devotion lavished on it by the gullible masses.
The word pantomime was first used in Britain in the 18th Century in Harlequinade shows.