harlequinade

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harlequinade

Theatre a play or part of a pantomime in which harlequin has a leading role
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Even so the list is likely to be incomplete since not all the harlequinade or comic scenes were submitted to the Lord Chamberlain.
20) More typically, the harlequinade, or comic scenes, provide sustained references.
Not only in farce, but in pantomime, too, the "driving mania" made its impact, especially on the routines of Joseph Grimaldi, the most popular player of the "Clown" role in the harlequinade portion of the standard pantomime.
The episode seems to unfold as in a harlequinade, with the indispensable help of signage to convey the topical satire: boorish Clown, perhaps, in the "flaunting" Tallyho representing "plebeian" (191) Birmingham, notorious for its "tawdry" mass-produced goods, with Harlequin Prime atop the dignified and patriotic Royal Mail, blowing a "shattering blast of triumph" on his coach trumpet "that was really too painfully full of derision" (192).
The Christmas harlequinades may have drawn on that year's craze for magpie plays, but they also offer the season's most direct treatments of Waterloo.
We might, at first, think such a masquerade scene is simply in keeping with the masking and unmasking that occurs throughout harlequinades, but the key to the power of this scene is not in the text but in its evocation of the actual event from the year of Napoleon's abdication in 1814.
Comedy appeared in the form of short farces, pantomime harlequinades and burlesques.
But there are far more elusive threads: le morceau bien peint ("the well-painted bit") of Thomas Couture's anecdotal harlequinades, for example, that once-famous academician's aligning of small passages of paint side by side in strokes so just and true that when examined closely they strike the eye as fractured and oddly abstract bits of pure materiality.
No more magical setting for his harlequinades can be imagined.
Neuber substituted a careful learning of parts and rehearsal for the heavily improvised farces and harlequinades that then dominated the German stage.
The Covent Garden harlequinade, Harlequin and Fortunio; or The Treasures of China, like Harlequin Brilliant, opens in an orientalizing mode, with the frame for the harlequinade proper taking place in China; the pantomime scenes take us to England, first to Brighton, with the Regent's oriental royal pavilion, and then London, before concluding on the field of Waterloo.
The frame of this harlequinade offers a kind of metatheatrical moment, where a poet, contemplating his last shilling, desires to write a tragedy but realizes the unlikelihood of that project bringing him abundant recompense.