HARM

(redirected from harmed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms.

HARM

[¦āch¦ā¦är′em or härm]
(engineering)
high-aspect-ratio micromachining.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is an affront to one's moral integrity to be harmed to minimize harm overall via certain causal routes; it is also an affront to be harmed to minimize harm overall when harm overall could be minimized without treading upon one's rights.
Cohen says, "Individuals can certainly be harmed by having their autonomy wrongly set back, but they can also be harmed by having their interest in conforming to a group--that is, an interest in being non-autonomous--wrongly set back" (p.
And just as having the person harmed define their own experience honors the person affected, having the larger community involved honors and engages the wisdom of the community.
If an act that harms a person would have no effect in preventing or rectifying a wrong for which he is responsible, he cannot be liable to be harmed by that act.
In crimes such as kidnapping, the liberty of the person who was kidnapped is harmed even when the person kidnapped has not suffered any physical injury.
consenters are harmed in such cases, they are not wronged because they
However, Sumner argues, factoring this kind of harm into the balancing act between the right to free expression and the right not be harmed by its exercise would ultimately be self-defeating (47).
Rather than concentrating on how physicians or health care systems can prevent errors or avoid lawsuits, using narratives focuses the moral lens on the needs of patients and families who have been harmed.
In summation, McLachlin wrote: "I conclude that the evidence provides no basis for concluding that the sexual conduct at issue harmed individuals or society.
Seeking to harm someone because you take them to have harmed you is not yet to seek revenge.
What hospitals need to do is develop and implement policies that ensure that all patients who are harmed by their treatment receive timely, open, complete information on the causes and circumstances that led to their injury, delivered in a compassionate manner by the responsible caregiver.
She took her first report to Senator Patrick Leahy who sponsored legislation to provide $18 million in aid to innocent Iraqis who were harmed in the military operations.