harmful interference

harmful interference

[′härm·fu̇l ‚int·ə′fir·əns]
(communications)
Radiation, emission, or induction which endangers the functioning of a radionavigation broadcasting service or of a safety broadcasting service, or obstructs or repeatedly interrupts a radio service operating in accordance with the appropriate regulations.
References in periodicals archive ?
In South Dakota, the reasonable use rule generates liability only when the landowner's "harmful interference with the flow of surface waters is unreasonable." (20) "There is no set formula for determining reasonableness," and it is to be determined "in light of all the circumstances." (21) Factors considered by courts include: (1) how each party uses the land and drainage water; (2) topography; (3) volume and direction of drainage; (4) consequences of drainage; (5) impact of artificial drainage changes such as grading, hard surfaces, and artificial drains; (6) alternatives available; and (7) avoidance of unnecessary injury.
DON Electromagnetic Spectrum Harmful Interference Reporting
The FCC strenuously enforces its rules against the unauthorized use of licensed radio spectrum and harmful interference with licensed users of the airwaves."
Improvements in technology and developments in global technical standards now ensure that on board internet service does not cause harmful interference to either aircraft operations or land-based public mobile networks.
"Operation shall not resume until the condition causing the harmful interference has been corrected," the FCC said.
The licensee will have to take all possible measures while installing its network that ensures that there is no harmful interference to other licensees' networks.
Also included in the agreement are coordination in the field of spectrum and wireless devices, coordination in the case of harmful interference or trans boundary signals, support by the Dubai Police general HQ in the field of inspection and judicial control, facilitation of TRA functions at border crossings of the country when needed, exchange of expertise in telecommunications and in emergencies and crises.
Third, how will the right to "freedom from harmful interference"--as referenced in USCSLC (20)--be enforced and implemented in conjunction with the property rights outlined in the statutes?
The required path loss or isolation (MCL), [L.sub.Required_path_loss], between the interfering transmitter ([I.sub.t]) and the victim receiver ([V.sub.t]) to ensure that there is no harmful interference is obtained from