HARM

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HARM

[¦āch¦ā¦är′em or härm]
(engineering)
high-aspect-ratio micromachining.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Then I suppose that we ought to do good to the just and harm to the unjust?
But see the consequence:--Many a man who is ignorant of human nature has friends who are bad friends, and in that case he ought to do harm to them; and he has good enemies whom he ought to benefit; but, if so, we shall be saying the very opposite of that which we affirmed to be the meaning of Simonides.
He sought to placate her; he urged his friendly intentions, and craned his neck to have a look at Teeka's balu; but the she-ape was not to be persuaded that he meant other than harm to her little one.
Then he chased the bright winged flies, and wounded them with the sharp thorn he carried for a sword; he broke the spider's shining webs, lamed the birds, and soon wherever he passed lay wounded insects and drooping flowers; while the winds carried the tidings over the garden, and bird and blossom looked upon him as an evil spirit, and fled away or closed their leaves, lest he should harm them.
“There can’t be any harm in locking up a creatur’ that will enter the pound,” said the constable, laughing, and closing the stocks on them both.
You treat him as a monster, you speak of his crime, he has done you harm and I find in you the same inexplicable pity that drove me to despair when I saw it in Christine!"
Not for some time would Johnny answer this question, and then only when Kennan told him that there was no harm done and that he intended to let the black go.
I did not know, I did not mean any harm,' they think it is all right.
"I love you all and have done no harm to anyone; why must I suffer so?
His fancies had for the most part revolved about the unsettled political conditions of Henry's reign, for from these he felt he might wrest that opportunity which could be turned to his own personal uses and to the harm, and possibly the undoing, of the King.
Trent had always felt that the man was his enemy - certainly the power to do him incalculable harm, if not to altogether ruin him, was his now.
Be assured they will not harm you unless you are scratched by them."