Harpy Eagle


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Harpy Eagle

 

(Harpia harpyja), a diurnal predatory bird of the family Accipitridae. Length, approximately 1 m; weight, up to 7.5 kg. It inhabits the tropical forests of Central and South America from Mexico to northern Argentina. It nests once every two years, building its nest in tall trees that rise above the forest. It lays a single egg and feeds its young for ten months. Its relatively short wings and long tail, characteristic of hawks, give the harpy eagle maneuverability in flight when searching for prey, which includes monkeys, sloths, opossums, and large parrots. Other large birds of prey of South America and Southeast Asia are also called harpy eagles.

REFERENCE

Fowler, J. M., and J. B. Cope. “Notes on the Harpy Eagle in British Guiana.” Auk, 1964, vol. 81, no. 3, pp. 257-73.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sloths in the diet of a Harpy Eagle nestling in eastern Amazon.
"It was all topped off when we spotted a Harpy eagle, the most powerful bird of prey on the planet.
The harpy eagle has talons the size of a grizzly bear's, three times more powerful than a Rottweiller's jaws and is capable of popping monkey skulls in a single crunch.
The jungle echoes with a loud scream as a monkey is caught in the harpy eagle's steely grip.
This deadly snake can devour a tapir (or well-fed tourist) and is one of the Amazon Big Three - with the jaguar and harpy eagle. In the pink We spotted pink dolphins in the Aguarico River (aptly meaning rich waters).
In the upper branches of a colossal tree, a harpy eagle tends to a chick in its nest.
Ruth Miller and Alan Davies have broken the world record for bird species spotted in a year, including the harpy eagle (inset)...
You come from the land of the swooping condor to that of the harpy eagle, from the redoubt of the shy spectacled bear to that of the revered jaguar.
He has conducted evolutionary genetic research on common loons (Gavia immer), field studies of loon behavior in Wisconsin, Michigan, Alaska and Scotland, and has worked on the population genetics of the threatened harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja).
"There's more chance of seeing a jaguar doing a fandango through our camp than seeing a harpy eagle," explains Gordon.
It was a profoundly restful ride as we slipped in virtual silence toward the kapok, brimming with expectation and excitement this would be the day, we had decided; the day a harpy eagle we named Pacuyo (alter the river) would come down to earth.