Harpy Eagle

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Harpy Eagle

 

(Harpia harpyja), a diurnal predatory bird of the family Accipitridae. Length, approximately 1 m; weight, up to 7.5 kg. It inhabits the tropical forests of Central and South America from Mexico to northern Argentina. It nests once every two years, building its nest in tall trees that rise above the forest. It lays a single egg and feeds its young for ten months. Its relatively short wings and long tail, characteristic of hawks, give the harpy eagle maneuverability in flight when searching for prey, which includes monkeys, sloths, opossums, and large parrots. Other large birds of prey of South America and Southeast Asia are also called harpy eagles.

REFERENCE

Fowler, J. M., and J. B. Cope. “Notes on the Harpy Eagle in British Guiana.” Auk, 1964, vol. 81, no. 3, pp. 257-73.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ecuador, along with Panama and Venezuela, is home to some of the best and most continuously studied sites of wild harpy eagles; yet as recently as the 1990s, researcher Mauricio Guerrero, studying for a university thesis, never found an active harpy nest in five years of work in the country.
For a greater understanding of what is necessary to best protect harpy eagles, basic knowledge of their "lost years" is imperative.
It was a profoundly restful ride as we slipped in virtual silence toward the kapok, brimming with expectation and excitement this would be the day, we had decided; the day a harpy eagle we named Pacuyo (alter the river) would come down to earth.
In August 2002, the Ecuadoran Ministry of the Environment decreed that the harpy eagle is representative of the country's biodiversity, that is, it is a flagship species.
Sloths in the diet of a Harpy Eagle nestling in eastern Amazon.
Breeding behavior of the Harpy Eagle (Harpia harpyja).