backpack

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backpack

a pack carried on the back of an astronaut, containing oxygen cylinders, essential supplies, etc

backpack

A parachute pack attached to the parachute harness at the upper back of the wearer. A short term for backpack parachute.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fiscal depute Lyndsay Hunter said the cannabis was valued at around PS5 and Johnstone had claimed he had taken the knuckleduster off a child and put it in the haversack "for safe keeping"and had forgotten it was there.
ONE in seven of all UK men use some sort of shoulder or cross-body fashion bag, not to be confused with a backpack or haversack that usually contains sandwiches, Pac a Mac, flask or shopping from the local Co-op or the washing a student might be taking home to his mother.
We see these thousands of men, women and children carrying ALL their belongings in a haversack on their backs.
This is perhaps why in this Sunday's Gospel, when Jesus sends the apostles on their mission, he instructs them not to bring anything for the journey - "no bread, no haversack, no money, no spare tunic." They should preach as they are.
Tyler's book, a robust little paperback designed for the glove compartment or haversack, seeks to illuminate the rich heritage of vocabulary used to describe the British countryside.
The tin, valued at 18s, was taken from a stack at the Ambassador Foods factory, The accused was stopped as he was leaving the factory and the tin of beef was found in his haversack. He denied stealing it.
Not only do you get air con, heated seats, a haversack of safety features and that clever electric roof, it'll also do 28mpg, 140mph and make you look a million dollars.
Till now only five lakh infantry soldiers are given this kit which includes a haversack for carrying necessary items for survival in extreme locations.
The only other thing she sees there is a battered haversack. It's an old canvas one like her dad used to have.
(7) In modern lore, the British allowed a haversack with false war plans to fall into the hands of the enemy Turks.
The haversack contained wicks, matches, pliers, shears, a funnel, two flame shades, and a wind shade.