hawse


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hawse

[hȯz]
(naval architecture)
The area in the bow of the ship where the hawsepipes are located.
The distance between the bow of a ship and the anchors.
References in periodicals archive ?
One, an 1866 almanac advertisement, (105) listed the wide range of items manufactured: patent windlasses, deck and mast winches, ship's cabooses, iron pumps, hawse and deck pipes, iron blocks, guns and shot, mill work, steam engines, hydraulic presses, screw presses, crab winches, quartz-crushing machines, stampers and duplicate castings, cast and wrought-iron ornamental railing, plain and fluted columns, pilasters for cottages and sink traps.
Multi-ply BURs and modifieds offer redundancy against leaks and puncture, while one open single-ply seam can cause hawse for the owner.
Trebilock and Robert Hawse, The Regulation of International Trade, 2nd ed (London, 1999), p.10.
At first glance, it might seem pointless to recover an animal responsible for the cliche "breeding like rabbits." However, the same challenges facing high-profile recovery efforts like the gray wolf (Canis lupis) or the California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) can also wreak hawse on a program with small, seemingly easy-to-work-with species such as the riparian brush rabbit.
See Hawse, supra note 1, at 102 ("[T]he issue of who gains and who loses within a given society rears its head and cannot be avoided or suppressed by any idea tractable to technocratic management of the trading system.").
SUBS: Hamilton, Scullion 6 for Hawse (46), McCabe 6, for McVeigh (81),
Finally, in the 2000 season, my good friend Richard Hawse of Lehew, West Virginia, released an arrow that culminated the legend of the Farrow House Buck.
Substitute Mick Morrell's header struck the post but that was the closest they came before their frustration was complete in injury-time, when Steve Hawse was sent off for a second booking.
To add insult to injury, the home side had Steve Hawse sent off for a second bookable offence on the stroke of full-time.
The anchor chain stampeded down the hawse pipe with a clatter and banging and the vessel shuddering brought up.
"Since 1953, when people first began summitting Everest, there's been a slightly different ethic and style in high-altitude mountaineering," says Angela Hawse, a member of the Everest Challenge Expedition.
Meanwhile three of his companions, Angela Hawse, Gareth Richards, and Tommy Heinrich, stood on Everest's south summit, about 274 m (1,228 ft) short of the ultimate prize.