hawser


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

hawser

Nautical a large heavy rope

hawser

[′hȯz·ər]
(naval architecture)
A large rope or cable, usually over 5 inches (13 centimeters) in diameter, generally used to tow or moor a ship or secure it at a dock.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most visually arresting works on show are two untitled pieces by young sculptor Eloise Hawser, who frequently uses 3-D printers in her work, relegating the fabrication process to a machine.
The train's the same, and so, astonishingly, is the Water Chute next door - a contraption somewhere between a giant tin bath and an army landing craft that hurtles down rails into the lake on the end of a thick hawser. The resulting splash is very gratifying, but I didn't feel the need to repeat it this time out.
The loading hose and where relevant, the mooring hawser are connected to the bow section of the off take tanker, it said.
Instructions (in English and French) were printed on something called a "tally-board" and, soon, a heavier rope called a "hawser" was pulled to the wreck.
Anita Hawser T he warning signs have been there for some time in global equities marke
Candida albicans biofilms were developed on polystyrene surface of 96-well plates as per standard methodologies (Hawser and Douglas 1994).
(14.) Young RC, Hawser DM, Anderson T, Fisher RI, Joffe E, De Vita VT Jr.
Grandparents and children alike can take part in a hawser tug of war and revive themselves by bobbing for peaches.
The answer is cordage, the general name for thread, string, cord, rope, hawser, and cable.
screening, which got off to a late start, the co-stars were ready and raring to mingle with guests in the Hawser Patron Lounge.
A chain that was part of the hawser - a line connecting the workboat to the dredger - broke, causing the line to snap back and hit the deckhand, the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) said in a report.