hawser

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hawser

Nautical a large heavy rope

hawser

[′hȯz·ər]
(naval architecture)
A large rope or cable, usually over 5 inches (13 centimeters) in diameter, generally used to tow or moor a ship or secure it at a dock.
References in periodicals archive ?
Radio Israel quoted the Israeli cabinet's secretary Tesfai Hawsers who said today that the Palestinian move constitutes an essential breach of the international agreements signed between the Palestinian Authority and Israel and violates the rules and allows the Israeli government to take any steps it deems necessary to protect its interests.
* he lady cyclists were just pulling away, their calf muscles brown and tight as hawsers. Carol shuddered into her seat and pulled her coat tight.
Heavy storm and giant waves caused damage to hawsers of the ships in the harbour.
In fact, the disc does not hover, but is suspended from the soaring height of the Chapter House's circular, domed gallery by nine slender steel hawsers. Seven large glass vessels, six of which are darkly clouded with carbon and water, are arranged, apparently randomly, on the glass disc.
While I was checking out the old ancestor-in-law I came across the phrase 'splicing the main brace', which I confess I thought was something a sailor might do with knots and hawsers.
They want a luxury SUVAupowerful, sumptuous, swimming in privilegeAubut they themselves are appalled at the overage of tonnage in vehicles such as the Mercedes-Benz M-class, BMW X5 or Land Rover LR3, the latter of which looks as if it should be throwing out its hawsers next to the Queen Mary.
The Chief Officer, Stenhouse, brought the ship back to Cape Evans through newly formed ice and ordered steel hawsers attached to two embedded anchors on shore as part of the wintering preparations.
The wreckage of the plane, a prototype of Britain's newest turbo-jet airliner, was secured with hawsers to lorries and tractors parked 50 yards away.
The organizers of the United Nations, notably such distinguished Americans as Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Ralph Bunche, in effect tried to constrain all nations within the legal steel hawsers of a doctrine of collective security.
You are encouraged to lend a hand on the 150 miles of ropes and hawsers, join the ship's watches or even polish the occasional piece of brasswork - unless of course you prefer to sip rum punches, plunge into the two swimming pools or just sunbathe.