haze layer

haze layer

[′hāz lā·ər]
(meteorology)
A layer of haze in the atmosphere, usually bounded at the top by a temperature inversion and frequently extending downward to the ground.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Titan's dense, nitrogen-dominated atmosphere sports a detached haze layer (seen at upper right) known as the North Polar Hood.
Figure 2(d) shows another haze image with thicker haze layer, and the extracted boundary images using common guided image filter and modified guided image filter are showed in Figures 2(e) and 2(f), respectively, which are also amplified 5 times uniformly for display.
If there is a significant haze layer on top of the fog, it appears brownish.
The presence of these complex, ringed hydrocarbons, known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), explains the origin of the aerosol particles found in the lowest haze layer that blankets Titan's surface.
Also, a haze layer surrounding Titan at the northern pole is significantly reduced during the equinox because of the atmospheric circulation patterns.
Scientists suspect that shifting seasons are accompanied by changing atmospheric patterns, and the collapsing haze layer could be one of a constellation of seasonal cycles.
Most personal airplanes are capable of getting enough altitude to rise above the haze layer, where the air is cooler and cleaner, and greater in-flight visibility means you can spot looming thunderstorms when they're much farther away.
To stay visual up high, you need to climb enough to top the haze layer that's frequently present during the late spring, summer and early fall.
Unfortunately, they could not find any clear air, and, after our rendezvous, we were in a haze layer.
Last summer, a team of scientists funded by the National Science Foundation began a $25 million surveillance of the Indian Ocean and discovered a huge haze layer covering 10 million square miles, approximately the size of the continental United States.
A Scripps spokesman, said there was a brownish haze layer over the Indian Ocean almost 1,000 miles off the coast.
A person in a balloon in Titan's haze layer wouldn't see the glow because it's too faint-something like a millionth of a watt.