haze

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haze,

suspension in the atmosphere of minute dust or salt particles that are not individually seen but that nevertheless reduce visibility. So-called damp haze and dry haze produce different optical effects because the particles of each are of different sizes, with the dry haze particles being smaller. Damp haze may develop from dry haze when water condenses on moisture-absorbing dry haze particles. Continuation of this condensation leads to the formation of fogfog,
aggregation of water droplets or ice crystals immediately above the surface of the earth (i.e., a cloud near the ground). A light or thin fog is usually called a mist. Fog may occur when the moisture content of the air is increased beyond the saturation point.
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. A hazy condition often occurs in the summer and affects large areas from cities to mountains. Such a haze is often caused by excessive amounts of pollutants resulting from combustion; for example, the Smoky Mountain haze in Tennessee is ascribed to sulfate particles.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Haze

 

atmospheric turbidity from the presence of solid particles (smoke, soot, dust) suspended in the air. Haze sometimes reduces visibility to as little as 1 km and, when very heavy, to hundreds or only dozens of m. Haze occurs in steppe and desert regions; in other areas, it can be observed in air masses that come from steppes and deserts. Severe haze accompanies dry winds. Haze over large cities (smog) is due to pollution of the air with smoke and dust of local origin.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

haze

[hāz]
(meteorology)
Fine dust or salt particles dispersed through a portion of the atmosphere; the particles are so small that they cannot be felt, or individually seen with the naked eye, but they diminish horizontal visibility and give the atmosphere a characteristic opalescent appearance that subdues all colors.
(optics)
The degree of cloudiness in a solution, cured plastic material, or coating material.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

haze

Dullness of a paint film resulting from formation of very fine surface imperfections.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

haze

The condition in which horizontal visibility on the earth's surface is greater than 2 miles (3 km) but less than 3 miles (5 km). The reduced visibility may be caused by either suspended water droplets and/or dust or smoke particles. In the latter case, it is called dust haze or smoke haze, as the case may be. On weather charts, haze is depicted by the symbol image.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

haze

Meteorol
a. reduced visibility in the air as a result of condensed water vapour, dust, etc., in the atmosphere
b. the moisture or dust causing this
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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En la bulla del patronadgo se ha entendido en hazer la minuta con todo cuydado y la han revisado Lamberto y los letrados de su Mad.
Although comparisons between men and women have primarily been made in terms of rookie experiences, Campo and colleagues (2005) found that men (8.8%) were significantly more likely to be self-defined hazers than were women (5.4%).
Sener and Hazer (2007) found that women who displayed environmentalist behaviour gave the universalism and benevolence values much more importance than the power, achievement and hedonism values.
Unlike perception of distributive justice, job satisfaction is known to closely reflect employees' emotion states and affective experiences (Williams & Hazer, 1986).