medusa

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Medusa

(mədo͞o`sə), in Greek mythology, most famous of the three monstrous GorgonGorgon
, in Greek mythology, one of three monstrous sisters, Stheno, Euryale, and Medusa; daughters of Ceto and Phorcus. Their hair was a cluster of writhing snakes, and their faces were so hideous that all who saw them were turned to stone. Only Medusa was mortal.
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 sisters. She was once a beautiful woman, but she offended Athena, who changed her hair into snakes and made her face so hideous that all who looked at her were turned to stone. When Medusa was with child by Poseidon, Perseus killed her and presented her head to Athena. Chrysaor and Pegasus sprang from her blood when she died. Medusa's head retained its petrifying power even after her death. Because of this power, her image frequently appeared on Greek armor. In some myths Athena used the Medusa head on her aegis.

medusa,

in zoology, scientific name for the jellyfishjellyfish,
common name for the free-swimming stage (see polyp and medusa), of certain invertebrate animals of the phylum Cnidaria (the coelenterates). The body of a jellyfish is shaped like a bell or umbrella, with a clear, jellylike material filling most of the space between
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, i.e., the free-swimming stage of various animals in the phylum CnidariaCnidaria
or Coelenterata
, phylum of invertebrate animals comprising the sea anemones, corals, jellyfish, and hydroids. Cnidarians are radially symmetrical (see symmetry, biological).
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. See polyp and medusapolyp and medusa,
names for the two body forms, one nonmotile and one typically free swimming, found in the aquatic invertebrate phylum Cnidaria (the coelenterates). Some animals of this group are always polyps, some are always medusae, and some exhibit both a polyp and a medusa
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.

Medusa

In Greek mythology, the mortal one of the three Gorgons, who had snakes for hair and whose head was cut off by Perseus to present to Athena as an ornament for her shield.

Medusa

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Medusa, asteroid 149 (the 149th asteroid to be discovered, on September 21, 1875), is approximately 26 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 3.2 years. Medusa was named after the famous Greek woman whose visage could turn men into stone. J. Lee Lehman associates this asteroid with “volcanic” temperaments, although she adds that in small doses, it may add spice to one’s character. Jacob Schwartz gives the astrological significance of Medusa as “the triumph of patriarchal forces over the matriarchal Gorgon Amazons of Lake Triton, or the slaying by Perseus, representing a naval triumph over the Gorgon rulers of the three main Azores islands, thus women of deadly abilities.”

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Lehman, J. Lee. The Ultimate Asteroid Book. West Chester, PA: Whitford Press, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Medusa

 

in ancient Greek mythology, one of the three Gorgons, winged monsters whose glance turned living beings into stone. Perseus, the hero of the Argos tales, overcame Medusa with the aid of the gods and presented her severed head to Athena, who fastened it to her shield, the aegis.

medusa

[mə′düs·ə]
(invertebrate zoology)

Medusa

beheaded by Perseus. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 206; Rom. Lit.: Metamorphoses]

Medusa

the only mortal Gorgon. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 161]

Medusa

her face was so hideous that any who saw it were turned to stone. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 596]

Medusa

creature with fangs, snake-hair, and protruding tongue. [Gk. Myth.: Hall, 206]

medusa

1. another name for jellyfish
2. one of the two forms in which a coelenterate exists. It has a jelly-like umbrella-shaped body, is free swimming, and produces gametes
References in periodicals archive ?
Carol Jacobs, in her close reading of Shelley's poem, can thus say that Shelley's text can be read in two ways, both as representing the head of Medusa as an object that is depicted, and as a performance of what Medusa does, undermining and undoing all categories of representation.
I have argued that the key to Petrarch's Medusa poems is recognizing Petrarch's alignment with Perseus after the slaying when the disembodied head of Medusa becomes a poetic tool of self-aggrandizement.
if you are from Africa you recognize Medusa's wings as the wings of Egypt, and you recognize the head of Medusa as the head of Africa: and you realize what you are seeing is the Western world's memorialization of that period in prehistory when the white male world of Greece decapitated and destroyed the black female Goddess/Mother tradition and culture of Africa .
It is partially gathered on his right shoulder under a gold lion mask pauldron while short pleats fall on both sides of a gold apotropaic head of Medusa, the Gorgoneion, centered on his chest.
We do least violence to Pindaric usage, to the meaning of the myth within the ode, and to the manuscripts' reading if we retain [GREEK TEXT OMITTED], construe [GREEK TEXT OMITTED] together, and keep the traditional punctuation.(18) Perseus shouts as he kills the "third part" of the triad of Gorgons in his appointed task of "bringing the head of Medusa" to its deservedly doomed recipient on Seriphos.
King Polydectes of Seriphus, who desired Danae, tricked Perseus into promising to obtain the head of Medusa, the only mortal among the Gorgons.
Here we find Perseus brandishing the head of Medusa, executed in a rich, warm-toned palette of cobalt blue, green and orange that is characteristic of the Urbino workshops (Fig.
At that age, my pocket money of 3/6d a week wouldn't stretch to buying books, but the first three books I did manage to buy were the Penguin Classics editions of Homer's epic poems The Iliad and The Odyssey, along with Edith Hamilton's Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes, the 1960s' Mentor edition of which had Perseus on the cover holding aloft the severed head of Medusa the gorgon.