head-down display


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head-down display (HDD)

head-down display (HDD)
A display inside the cockpit, usually a radarscope, or a CRT (cathode-ray tube) raster with a symbology and TV overlay. It normally is placed below or alongside the instrument panel.
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A head-down display is breaking additional new ground with FAA.
Evaluation pilots from the 412th Flight Test Squadron and the Air Force Test Pilot School also conducted blind low-level profiles and approaches using head-up and head-down displays that were equipped with synthetic-vision elements.
Also in work is the Enhanced Vision System, which presents an infrared image of the external environment on the head-up and head-down displays.
In addition to impressive head-down displays, PlaneView incorporates the latest in Head-Up Display (HUD) technology with the next generation Visual Guidance System.
Evaluation pilots from the 412th Flight Test Squadron and the Air Force Test Pilot School conducted blind low level profiles and approaches using Rockwell Collins head-up and head-down displays that were equipped with synthetic vision elements.
The NVIDIA-based graphics subsystems will be incorporated into advanced, high-resolution Head-Down Displays (HDDs) that allow the pilot to view high resolution digital moving maps and incoming sensor video with symbology and other overlays, enact weapons guidance, increase situational awareness and perform other mission critical aircraft management functions.
An integrated head tracker cues the software to present information for head-up and head-down displays -- including flight instruments, moving maps, targeting information, and intelligence data -- that will appear to be superimposed on the aircraft instrument panel and on the real world scene outside of the aircraft.
Cockpit displays mounted in the instrument panel allow the pilot to view a variety of information, and are called Head-Down Displays (HDDs), because the pilot views them by looking down.
At 7 percent above stall speed, pilots will get a visual indication of the stall warning on both the head-up and head-down displays, as well as an audio warning in the headset.