headline


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

headline

[′hed‚līn]
(mining engineering)
In dredging, the line which is anchored ahead of the dredge pond and holds the dredge up to its digging front.
References in periodicals archive ?
""I was disappointed that with Ken's rich legacy, the Nation did not give him a major headline when he died.
Neither side made reference to the story the headline described, which, it is probably relevant to note, had way more than 280 characters and which, while no objective reader could find it particularly balanced, conveyed a thorough description of the issues it addressed with substantial and substantive commentary from many points of view.
'I'm angry that people think it's okay to write headlines about people's body shapes,' she wrote, citing that she had been open about recovering from an eating disorder.
Headline: COA flags PCSO for R5.89-B non-charity spending
Every outlet had that story, so Grovum waited until the closing bell on Wall Street to share the story with a new headline focused on the company's stock closing 4.1 percent higher despite the president's attacks.
"Please disregard the headlines that ran on Dow Jones Newswires between 9:34 a.m.
UPDATE: Yeni Akit later changed the headline to remove the word 'pervert.' The article has been edited to reflect this.
The Al-Masry A-Youm headline, the most widely circulated privately-owned newspaper in Egypt, was subsequently changed to "Salman visit's toll: agreements worth $25bn".
We probably see 100 headlines like these everyday while scrolling down our Facebook timelines or reading local new sites--or maybe even going straight to the source with sites like Huffington Post.
Interestingly, the headline was not among Musetto's favourite that he wrote for the newspaper.
Organisers have already revealed Kanye West and Foo Fighters will be two of the three headline acts - and still people want to attend.
But no headline. The bold-faced first sentence plays that role.