headline


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headline

[′hed‚līn]
(mining engineering)
In dredging, the line which is anchored ahead of the dredge pond and holds the dredge up to its digging front.
References in periodicals archive ?
I was worried going into it maybe headlines are boring.
Goodbye, Human Race" reads a headline at the top of The Huffington Post.
A few years ago, when we moved to a slightly different way of putting the paper together, reporters were charged with at least having a go at headlines It didn't, er, work.
By omitting some linguistic items from a headline, the writer leaves out a part of the statement, for the reader to retrieve the whole meaning from the linguistic context, namely the elements surrounding the part omitted.
There is oniy one headline coming under the act of forbidding.
The headline was eventually removed, and ESPN was forced to apologize Saturday.
It was a very sad event and I do not want to diminish it in any way, however I must protest at the constant pessimistic, downbeat, harmful, depressing, unenthusiastic front page headlines.
The empirical evidence presented here indicates headline and core measures of inflation are co-integrated, suggesting long-run co-movement.
It's the online aspect that's creating much current discussion, if not confusion: is headline style online any different from in print?
Increasing Social Security tax on wealthiest could raise billions" reads a four-column headline at the top of the front page of the Charleston Gazette.
It's flattering to make the big time in this fashion, but Kerry's ad makes the headline look like something other than what it was.