headwind


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headwind

a wind blowing directly against the course of an aircraft or ship
References in periodicals archive ?
A 20-knot headwind or tailwind for a gliding 747 makes for a rounding error, but for an engine-out single it can mean the difference between an on-airport landing and an off-airport tragedy.
The education headwind involves both educational attainment and educational performance.
Haajes lands the finale under Tom Queally Eureka and Richard Hughes win the 6f conditions contest after battling through the strong headwind
Two headwinds on the current recovery were identified by the president of the Cleveland Fed, Sandra Pianalto, in a recent speech.
In addition to inflation, comparable-store sales in the second quarter will face the headwind of cycling last year's stimulus cheeks, which contributed to our higher comp sales for that quarter," he said.
Could the headwind be in the sales of the newest kid on the life insurance block, the indexed universal life policy?
Usain Bolt battled the cold and a headwind, and was forced to come from behind to beat Asafa Powell in 9.
The lecturer at the College of Further Education in Flensburg, Germany, said: "Admittedly, it is too big for normal roads and it has to be pointed into a headwind for maximum effect.
54 into a headwind was solid, but Bianca Knight of Mississippi's Ridgeland High extended the difference between her and the rest of the country with a 23.
And I thank God for President Bush's leadership on an initiative that has faced a steady headwind from day one.
19sec into a headwind in his semi-final earlier in the afternoon.