headwind


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

headwind

a wind blowing directly against the course of an aircraft or ship
References in periodicals archive ?
Yael Selfin, chief economist at KPMG UK, said headwinds would also come from the slowing state of the global economy.
In exchange for these rights, MTUU and HeadWind have agreed to a licensee fee of USD 400,000 paid to HeadWind in three tranches over 45 days from closing, and a continuing royalty equal to 3.0% of gross sales.
A 20-knot headwind or tailwind for a gliding 747 makes for a rounding error, but for an engine-out single it can mean the difference between an on-airport landing and an off-airport tragedy.
The fourth headwind reflects CBO projections that the federal debt-GDP ratio will rise steadily after 2020 as a result of growth in entidements, mainly Social Security and Medicare.
There could be a gentle breeze there, if not a headwind.
Headwind recordIt was the fastest run ever into a headwind, and matched the sixth-fastest time in history despite the chilly temperature.
We encountered a 35-knot headwind that, combined with Comfort heading away from us at 20 knots, left us out of gas halfway from nowhere.
Standards were high, but Ruddock confirmed her excellent indoor winter form by winning her heat of the 100 metres in 11.9 seconds, into a headwind of three metres per second, before taking the final in 12.12 despite a poor start where she gave away three metres to the rest of the field.
headwind will cause a 10:00 miler to lose 60 to 90 seconds per mile, and an 8:00 miler to lose 45 to 60 seconds per mile.
Bright sun, with a cool, light breeze on Saturday, and a hot headwind for much of Sunday--with a brief sprinkle or a cooling gully washer depending on where one was on the route Saturday afternoon.
The Company now expects these items to be a 5 to 6 point headwind on net revenues and a 4 to 5 point headwind on income before taxes in the second quarter.