hearsay

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hearsay:

see evidenceevidence,
in law, material submitted to a judge or a judicial body to resolve disputed questions of fact. The rules discussed in this article were developed in England for use in jury trials.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"I've been in court many times when someone is questioning a witness about a conversation that took place outside of court and they dance around the hearsay rule, perhaps by having the jury connect the dots" he said.
Proof evincing the mailing must be presented in admissible form, including where it is applicable, meeting the business records exception to the hearsay rule. Applying this rule to the facts of this case, plaintiff demonstrated entitlement to summary judgment.
See also James H Chadbourn, "Bentham and the Hearsay Rule: A Benthamic View of Rule 63 (4)(C) of the Uniform Rules of Evidence" (1962) 75:5 Harv L Rev 932 at 933 (arguing the influence did not extend to hearsay law--a complaint that seems to have since been rectified).
utterance as an exception to the hearsay rule. (30) The general criteria
Section 1235 admits inconsistent statements of witnesses because the dangers against which the hearsay rule is designed to protect are largely nonexistent.
(1) Hearsay evidence is defined as "a statement, other than one made by the declarant while testifying at the trial or hearing, offered in evidence to prove the truth of the matter asserted," (2) and is generally inadmissible unless it falls either under an enumerated exception or is considered "residual." (3) The business records exception and the "residual" hearsay rule are generally applicable to digital data but adopt differing approaches to trustworthiness or reliability.
"Doing this right makes the evidence 'in contemplation of death' which is an exception to the hearsay rule ...
Fenner (constitutional law, Creighton U.) presents a treatise explaining the law and application of the hearsay rule in US courts, with a special emphasis on exclusions and exceptions, including those found outside the Rules of Evidence, such as those found in the Federal Rules of Civil and Criminal Procedure.