heat conductivity


Also found in: Dictionary.

heat conductivity

[′hēt ‚kän·dək′tiv·əd·ē]
(thermodynamics)

thermal conductivity

The rate of transfer of heat by conduction; the amount of heat per unit of time per unit area that is conducted through a slab of unit thickness of a material if the difference in temperature between opposite faces is one degree of temperature; a property of the material itself, usually represented by the letter k and called k factor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The specific heat, density and heat conductivity parameter multiplication of material No2 and No4 are equal and higher than material No3.
The heat conductivity of fibres is [10.sup.3] times larger than that of the matrix in the first two examples and [10.sup.5] times larger in the third example (38 fibres, so as in example 2).
It also lowers the silica content of the molding sand as a whole, which lowers its heat conductivity and makes it prone to metal penetration.
From the figure it is evident that the temperature firstly increases with increasing the time this can be attributed to the increased absorbed energy which over compensates the heat losses given by the heat conductivity inside the material.
A new bioplastic composed of plant-based material and carbon fiber is said to demonstrate higher heat conductivity than stainless steel.
Manufacturers compensate for this shortcoming by adding other materials like aluminum to the pan base to improve heat conductivity and distribution.
The technology has a good heat conductivity and heat transfer as a result of its pure solid copper filling and its lack of any additional components like glass.
In theory, the high strength and superior heat conductivity of carbon nanotubes could yield more-capable heat shields than those available today.
Mold pre-heaters for tire curing presses reduce press downtime after mold changing, provide good heat conductivity, feature a standard design for passenger and light truck molds, and offer molds that are independently inserted and removed, according to the company.
While many adult bakers opt to use tin bakeware for heat conductivity, Kaiser is closing out tin on its children's models in favor of non-stick coatings.
[k.sub.eff] = Effective heat conductivity of foam sheet, cal/cm/s/[degrees] K.