heat insulator

heat insulator

[′hēt ‚ins·ə‚lād·ər]
(materials)
A substance having relatively low heat conductivity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As shown in figures 1 and 2 above, the SOLISS system has an optical communication unit, a biaxial gimbal, and a monitor camera that are partially exposed to space, while the rest is covered with a multi-layer heat insulator. The optical communication unit employs Sony's optical disk technology, which is the fruit of Sony's development starting in the 1970s and commercial applications such as CDs, MDs, DVDs, and Blu-ray discs.
The composite material is a heat insulator while brass is a conductor, he noted.
Satyendra Pathak Doha Taiwanese manufacturers of energy-efficient heat insulator glasses are in talks with Qatari companies to set up factories in the country, a senior official of Taiwan External Trade Development Council (TAITRA) said on Sunday.
The Cheshire Cat grins above a tableau where Alice (Alice in Wonderland) seeks shelter under a giant mushroom made of heat insulator and Styrofoam.
The substantial growth of other types is mainly attributed to polymer aerogel, which is emerging as an efficient and cost effective heat insulator.
It helps them to get a good grip on icy surfaces and also acts as a good heat insulator. CATS have got more than one hundred vocal sounds while dogs only have about 10.
Caralium is a unique composite mineral tile that is an excellent sound and heat insulator, so it's warmunderfoot and slip-resistant.
However, in thicker-walled industrial parts, the foam acts as a heat insulator, extending cycle times and eliminating the productivity advantage.
Fiat South Africa has announced contracts amounting to US$ 64 million to provide heat insulators for exhaust pipes and parts of catalytic converters to the Fiat plants in Italy.
Decree 232 is aimed at serving citizens that require construction materials, with Al-Rashidi stating that the funds would be provided for limestone, paints, electrical cables, ceramics, porcelain, and water and heat insulators, among others.
Decree 232 aims to create more options for citizens for their constructional needs, revealed Al-Rashidi who noted that subsidies were now paid not only for limestone and paints, but also extended to other materials such as electrical cables, ceramics, porcelain, water and heat insulators, and so on.