heat sterilization

heat sterilization

[′hēt ‚ster·ə·lə′zā·shən]
(engineering)
An act of destroying all forms of life on and in bacteriological media, foods, hospital supplies, and other materials by means of moist or dry heat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier studies have shown that wet heat sterilization can destroy disease-causing bacteria, but the mechanisms whereby spores are killed by this treatment had not been fully revealed.
however, since devices such as the incucyte s3 live cell analysis system can not be decontaminated by heat sterilization, the co2 incubator to be procured must offer the possibility of decontamination with h2o2.
Vertical sterilizer can be suitably used for dry heat sterilization.
2] incubator features an elevated 180 C (355 F) dry heat sterilization cycle.
Sterilization method includes heat sterilization, low temperature sterilization, filtration sterilization and radiation sterilization.
Rose tried to find the correct procedure for sterilization monitoring by searching the ECP, but again the plan had not been updated with correct dry heat sterilization monitoring.
Dry heat sterilization is not recommended for handpieces.
Again, many people blamed heat sterilization for the loss (p.
New Delhi, July 10 -- Sterilization can be divided into three categories - Heat Sterilization, Low Temperature Sterilization and Filtration Sterilization on the basis of methods used for sterilization of equipments.
They cover the steam and dry heat sterilization of biomaterials and medical devices, principles and standards of sterilizing healthcare products by ionizing radiation, the ethylene oxide sterilization of healthcare products, non-traditional sterilization techniques for biomaterials and medical devices, sterilizing and decontaminating surfaces by plasma discharges, sterilization techniques for polymers, sterilizing drug-device products and tissue allografts by ionizing radiation, antimicrobial coatings for self-sterilization, prions and endotoxins: reprocessing strategies for reusable medical devices, and future trends.
In addition," the compan notes, "significant savings are realized in energy required for heat sterilization and water use.
Vials and ampoules, for example, are purchased already sterilized, so their closures do not require steam sterilization, dry heat sterilization or irradiation prior to aseptic manufacturing.