heating degree-day

heating degree-day

[′hēd·iŋ di′grē ‚dā]
(meteorology)
A form of degree-day used as an indication of fuel consumption; in United States usage, one heating degree-day is given for each degree that the daily mean temperature departs below the base of 65°F (where the Celsius scale is used, the base is usually 19°C).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

heating degree-day

Same as degree day.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Annual degree-day information (including heating degree-day and cooling degree-day) is usually continuous.
For example, heating degree-day base 18.3[degrees]C (65[degrees]F) is often used to estimate the heating energy required to heat buildings via a proportionality factor specific to each building (ASHRAE 2005a).
Each day's heating degree-days are summed to create a heating degree-day measure for a specified reference period.
The preliminary results showed that the radiant system used 22% more fuel per heating degree-day than the forced-air system.
Curtis, is driven by Effective Heating Degree-Day daily weather patterns, such as design, normal, warm and extreme.
These regression models can be used in conjunction with commonly-known methods of calculating building heating and cooling energy use such as the heating degree-day (HDD) and cooling degree-day (CDD) methods.
As a result, the colder weather almost doubled the number of residential heating degree-days versus the same 2018 period.
The results indicated that air temperature, in the form of heating degree-days and cooling degree-days, was significant in all eight states; additionally, wind speed was significant in four states and humidity was significant in only one state.
Also as anticipated, to an extent natural gas and electricity consumption in the commercial sector was sensitive to weather, evidenced by the statistical significance of natural gas consumption to heating degree-days and electricity consumption to cooling degree-days.
One useful way to view this information is to observe the spring and fall months, when cooling degree-days and heating degree-days cross over.
For example heating degree-days base 18.3[degrees]C (65[degrees]F) are often used to estimate the energy required to heat buildings, via a proportionality factor specific to each building (ASHRAE, 2005a, Chapter 32: Energy Estimating and Modeling Methods).
Heating degree-days are deviations of the mean daily temperature below 65 degrees Fahrenheit.