heave


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heave

the horizontal displacement of rock strata at a fault

heave

[hēv]
(geology)
The horizontal component of the slip, measured at right angles to the strike of the fault.
(mining engineering)
A rising of the floor of a mine caused by its being too soft to resist the weight on the pillars.
A predominantly upward movement of the surface of the soil due to expansion or displacement.
(oceanography)
The motion imparted to a floating body by wave action.

heave

The upward movement of soil caused by expansion or displacement resulting from phenomena such as moisture absorption, the removal of overburden, the driving of piles, and the action of frost.
References in periodicals archive ?
Frost heave results from ice forming beneath the surface of soil during freezing conditions in the atmosphere.
Such soil is referred to as "frost heave susceptible.
Unfortunately, upward frost heave can be a concern if the ground freezes against the foundation.
With many rubble foundations, we dodge the adfreezing bullet and lateral frost heave forces because the rubble foundation wall is a pretty good drainage medium (Figure 9).
When only a few stones--about 100 per square meter--were scattered across the pair's cybertundra, frost heave shaped them into small heaps.
This may seem like a pain if you're adding a deck or front porch, but porch floors can heave up under doors, and tilting decks can pull house walls outward.
Soils that contain coarse particles of gravel and sand drain well and won't usually heave, because they don't collect and hold enough water to form frost lenses.
The new equations apply to any pure, frozen substance and thus appear to rule out the notion that frost heave results from water's unusual habit of expanding as it freezes, Dash says.
On a local level, Wolff wants to help bring Vermont into the 21st century with the Frost Heaves - the name comes from a common term in the region that describes what happens when the moist ground freezes so fast that it juts up and brings traffic to a crawl.
As with the human counterpart diseases, the airways of horses afflicted with heaves become clogged with mucus or damaged by scars, and inadequate blood oxygenation depletes them of their energy.