heaving


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heaving

[′hēv·iŋ]
(naval architecture)
Vertical motion of a ship, as distinguished from pitching.
(petroleum engineering)
Partial or total collapse of drill hole walls resulting from internal pressures mainly due to swelling from hydration or formation gas pressures.
References in periodicals archive ?
This may be attributed to that the external load is much less than the huge frost-heaving force generated by the frost heaving inside the soil, so the restraining effect of the overlying load on frost-heaving ratio is very small.
Penner, "Ground Freezing and Frost Heaving," Canadian Building Digest 26, Division of Building Research, National Research Council of Canada, February 1962.
Exactly one year (February 1931) after the appearance of the pivotal "Our Literary Audience," Brown, in "The Literary Scene: Chronicle and Comment," began heaving brickbats - ever so subtly: "We are not as yet a reading public," he diplomatically opens, formally introducing himself as "Chronicler." Brown then delivers a mini-lecture on the power of books as tools, particularly in the Depression era, and he further describes his task as that of providing "the reader of Opportunity a list of whatever books and articles he is able to find that bear directly or indirectly upon our concerns" (53).