hedge

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Related to hedges: privet hedge

hedge,

ornamental or protective barrier composed of shrubs or small trees growing in close rows. The plants may be allowed to grow naturally or may be trimmed to various heights and shapes (see topiary worktopiary work
, pruning and training of shrubs and trees into ornamental shapes, used in landscape gardening. Elaborate topiary work in which trees and shrubs are clipped to resemble statuary (e.g.
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). In the temperate zone, thorny hedge plants include barberry, Osage orange, buckthorn, and hawthorn. Popular evergreen hedge plants are box, privet, azalea, yew, arborvitae, rhododendron, mountain laurel, and holly. Decorative deciduous shrubs often used are lilac, forsythia, mock orange, spiraea, euonymus, and viburnum. Hedges may also serve in erosion control, e.g., Rosa rugosa planted along highway embankments and the rows of poplars, hemlocks, and other trees planted as shelter belts.

hedge

1. A barrier or fence formed by bushes or small trees growing close together;
2. A closely grown row of any kind of shrubbery.

hedge

a row of shrubs, bushes, or trees forming a boundary to a field, garden, etc.
References in classic literature ?
And really, I do not think the impression will soon be over," said Emma, as she crossed the low hedge, and tottering footstep which ended the narrow, slippery path through the cottage garden, and brought them into the lane again.
At last the horses began to go more slowly, as if they were climbing up-hill, and presently there seemed to be no more hedges and no more trees.
He attempted to force his tray through the hedge, but in vain; the laurel was impenetrable, and the noise he made attracted the attention of the approaching couple.
But in vain he examined all the hedges and all the thickets; in vain he questioned everyone he met along the road.
In the midst of that hell, a column of soldiers was forcing its way to the bridge, between two hedges of dead bodies.
Imagine on the balustrade of this terrace a number of tall vases of blue and white pottery, in which are gilliflowers; and to right and left, along the neighboring walls, hedges of linden closely trimmed in, and you will gain an idea of the landscape, full of tranquil chastity, modest cheerfulness, but commonplace withal, which surrounded the venerable edifice of the Cormon family.
Pepper plants replaced the prickly hedges of European fields; sago-bushes, large ferns with gorgeous branches, varied the aspect of this tropical clime; while nutmeg-trees in full foliage filled the air with a penetrating perfume.
There were no hedges, no signs of proprietary rights, no evidences of agriculture; the whole earth had become a garden.
Anyone coming along the road from Chobham or Wo- king would have been amazed at the sight--a dwindling mul- titude of perhaps a hundred people or more standing in a great irregular circle, in ditches, behind bushes, behind gates and hedges, saying little to one another and that in short, excited shouts, and staring, staring hard at a few heaps of sand.
Black figures are seen scattered over the long white avenues; the silence of earth and heaven is alone broken by the noise made by the crackling branches of hedges planted around the monuments; then follows the melancholy chant of the priests, mingled now and then with a sob of anguish, escaping from some woman concealed behind a mass of flowers.
And this blessed gift of venerating love has been given to too many humble craftsmen since the world began for us to feel any surprise that it should have existed in the soul of a Methodist carpenter half a century ago, while there was yet a lingering after-glow from the time when Wesley and his fellow-labourer fed on the hips and haws of the Cornwall hedges, after exhausting limbs and lungs in carrying a divine message to the poor.
Her pleasure in the walk must arise from the exercise and the day, from the view of the last smiles of the year upon the tawny leaves, and withered hedges, and from repeating to herself some few of the thousand poetical descriptions extant of autumn, that season of peculiar and inexhaustible influence on the mind of taste and tenderness, that season which had drawn from every poet, worthy of being read, some attempt at description, or some lines of feeling.