heel


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Related to heel: Heel spur, heel pain

heel

1
1. the back part of the human foot from the instep to the lower part of the ankle
2. the corresponding part in other vertebrates
3. Horticulture the small part of the parent plant that remains attached to a young shoot cut for propagation and that ensures more successful rooting
4. Nautical
a. the bottom of a mast
b. the after end of a ship's keel
5. the back part of a golf club head where it bends to join the shaft
6. Rugby possession of the ball as obtained from a scrum (esp in the phrase get the heel)

heel

2
inclined position from the vertical

Heel

The lower end of an upright member, especially one resting on a support.

What does it mean when you dream about a heel?

The heel is often used synonymously for the foot as a symbol, for example, to represent violence or oppression (e.g., under the heel of a dictator). As the part of the body most often in contact with the ground and dirt, it can be a symbol of the base or ignoble, for instance, a low, vile, contemptible, despicable person (a “heel”). The heel is also often represented by the analogous part of a shoe, which is frequently in shabby condition (“down at the heels”), perhaps signifying something in the dreamer’s life that needs attention. Finally, the heel can also represent vulnerability, as in an Achilles’ heel.

heel

[hēl]
(mechanical engineering)
(metallurgy)
A quantity of molten metal remaining in the ladle after pouring a metal cast-ing.
A quantity of metal retained in an induction furnace during a stand-by period.
(navigation)
Of a ship, to incline or to be inclined to one side.
(ordnance)
Upper corner of the butt of a rifle stock held in firing position.

heel

1. The lower end of an upright timber, esp. one resting on a support.
2. The lower end of the hanging stile of a door.
3. The floor brace for timbers that brace a wall.
4. The trailing edge of the blade of a bulldozer, or the like.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even though only around 30 percent of women still wear heels to work, according to data Crum cites, there's still a dominant notion that powerful women wear power heels.
You see it on the red carpet, famous faces alighting from limousines and strolling casually into the theatre, confidently and serenely, raised up on five inch, stick thin heels, feet bent double and not flinching for a second.
The higher the heel, the more these small neck muscles are activated and this can lead to muscle fatigue, cervical spine problems, and pain.
According to foot experts, the ideal female shoe shape has a contoured foot base to support the foot arch and a small heel (2-4cm) to absorb heel impact.
The Achilles tendon at the heel can shorten and get stiff.
Prolonged heel wearing can even permanently shorten calf tendons.
Rotating the ankles daily is essential and also some heel to
The researchers suggest that the higher the heel the greater the risk of an ankle sprain if running.
While there is an established connection between high heels and foot pain, this is the first time the effect of shoes on feet can be seen in real time.
2 - Take small steps, the taller the heel the shorter the step.
Researchers in Australia found that regular outings in towering heels shorten the fibres in women's calf muscles and can change the position of joints and muscles in the feet, BBC reported.