height of tide

height of tide

[′hīt əv ′tīd]
(oceanography)
Vertical distance from the chart datum to the level of the water at any time; it is positive if the water level is higher than the chart datum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The perfect water depth will change according to strength and height of tide. Slower, lower tides will find trout in water as deep as 12 feet, whereas stronger, higher tides may find them in shallower runs of four to six feet.
Number of shorebirds counted was clearly inverse to height of tide (Fig.
The increase in the speed of southwestern winds will also cause the height of tides to increase over the next three days.
Facilities like this can be built in every LGA, taking the height of tides of the flood in 2012 as the basis for sand-filling of the areas.
About 680sq km of coastland, including parts of all major cities, are under threat from sea surges and flooding at the height of tides.
Surely any threat to property or life is determined by the standard of flood defences, not the height of tides. Or, maybe the Government is expecting sea levels to rise by two metres or so and haven't got round to telling anyone yet?