heliocentric


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heliocentric

[¦hē·lē·ō¦sen·trik]
(astronomy)
Relative to the sun as a center.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pope Urban VIII, an admirer of Galileo, apparently was not convinced of the incompatibility of the heliocentric theory and the Catholic faith, and he intervened to prevent Galileo from being charged with heresy.
Even worse, while at least one Western historian (Emilie Savage-Smith) of the medieval Islamic era asserted that no Islamic astronomer proposed a heliocentric Universe, where the Sun is at the centre rather than Earth, Al Qushji may well have advanced the empirical evidence for the Earth's rotation through numerous observations of comets and other celestial bodies.
! New Delhi, Muharram 27, 1435, Nov 30, 2013, SPA -- India's Mars-bound spacecraft is scheduled to complete a key manoeuvre to move out of the earth's orbit into a heliocentric orbit towards the Red Planet in the small hours of Sunday, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) officials say, according to dpa.
Citing Copernicus, whose Heliocentric theory proved that the earth and other planets rotate around the sun as opposed to the belief that earth was the center of the universe, Mr.
This was the main manoeuvre in a series that ensured the satellite was boosted away from its operational orbit around the L2 Sun-Earth Lagrange Point and into a heliocentric orbit, further out and slower than Earth's.
Almost 400 years after Galileo was jailed for his groundbreaking observations of a heliocentric universe, the Italian courts seem to be up to their old tricks again, now persecuting nationally recognized scientists for something completely out of their control.
It appears that if the cometary nucleus exhibits an unusually slow rotation rate and its surface is suitably microporous, then the melting of water ice is especially favoured at heliocentric distances of 1-3AU, and at 5-12AU hydrocarbons can melt.
Here he examines the relevant mathematics in the shift from a geocentric view of creation to a heliocentric view, a process that was complete by the 17th century.
Albert died in 1280, but his scholarship laid the groundwork for modern scientific inquiry centuries later, including Galileo's heliocentric model of the solar system.
Well known even in his time as a physicist, mathematician and astronomer, Galileo Galilei (1564-1642), sometimes called the father of modern science, confirmed theories such as a heliocentric universe and that objects accelerate at the same rate in a vacuum, a building block of Newtonian physics.