helium I


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helium I

[′hē·lē·əm ′wən]
(cryogenics)
The phase of liquid helium-4 which is stable at temperatures above the lambda point (about 2.2 K) and has the properties of a normal liquid, except low density.
References in periodicals archive ?
While it's all over the universe, there are only a few places on Earth where helium is regularly extracted.
"Helium is blown away from the day side of the planet to its night side at over 10'000 km/h because it is such a light gas, it escapes easily from the attraction of the planet and forms an extended cloud all around it," Vincent Bourrier, co-author of the study, explained.
Helium is essential to many applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); fibre optics and semiconductor manufacturing; metallurgy; breathing atmospheres for deep diving or unique blood gas medical mixtures; lifting for high altitude scientific research balloons, blimps; and other advanced applications.
Helium is an excellent contender for carrier gas but increasing prices and supply shortage are raising concerns among scientists as well as sourcing communities.
Furthermore, recycle systems are easily installed, and when maintenance is performed on such a system, the ongoing supply of helium is maintained by providing bulk helium as a backup.
Helium is a byproduct of natural gas and the current crisis is one of supply and demand, with the global demand for helium for everything from balloons to MRI machines far outpacing the noble gas' scarce supply.
Helium is the second element of the periodic table and is one of the most abundant elements in the universe, yet it is fairly rare on Earth.
A world shortage of liquid helium is expected to remain severe at least until the second half of 2013.
That is, although helium is typically regarded as a nonpsychoactive gas (an issue we discuss below), these decedents were nonetheless attempting to get high using helium and suffocated in consequence.
Helium is the only element that can remain at a sufficiently cold temperature to allow for the stable and uniform magnetic field the MRI scanners need to work.