helium-3


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helium-3

[′hē·lē·əm ′thrē]
(nuclear physics)
The isotope of helium with mass number 3, constituting approximately 1.3 parts per million of naturally occurring helium.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the research, Dygert and his team looked into the distribution of two very specific noble gas isotopes: Helium-3 and Neon-22.
However, the only really practical to provide continuous cooling at lower temperatures is to use Helium-3: either by pumping on its surface (to about 250mK) or by dilution refrigeration (to a few mK).
The prize potentially on offer is the extraction of Helium-3, a variant of the everyday helium found in balloons.
In the 1970s scientists discovered that helium-3, a rare isotope of the element, also has a superfluid state at temperatures lower than 2 millikelvins.
Ouyang Ziyuan, head of lunar exploration, outlined plans to exploit the vast quantities of helium-3 thought to lie buried in lunar rock.
Our detector design builds on the success of a segmented helium-3 ionization chamber and a neutron MicroMegas detector.
Fusion researchers have long been interested in the possibility of using the fusion of deuterium with helium-3 rather than with tritium because of the radioactivity associated with the deuterium-tritium fuel cycle.
Scientists believe they have found vast areas of Helium-3 gas, and have drawn up maps to guide Moon prospectors.
In 1962 the German-born British physicist Heinz London (1907-1970) used a mixture of the two helium isotopes helium-4 and helium-3 for the purpose.
Packard, heard a whistle from reservoirs of helium-3 separated by a sieve like membrane (SN: 8/2/97, p.
Then, in 1972, experimenters found that a rare isotope of helium known as helium-3 also becomes a superfluid.
The article states that the "concentration of radioactive helium-3 isotopes" in rocks suggests information about the history of the rocks.