helm


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helm

Nautical
a. the wheel, tiller, or entire apparatus by which a vessel is steered
b. the position of the helm: that is, on the side of the keel opposite from that of the rudder

Helm

A bulbous termination to the top of a tower, found in central and eastern Europe.

helm

[helm]
(naval architecture)
The tiller or wheel controlling a ship's rudder.
The entire apparatus for steering a ship.
References in classic literature ?
I let him take the helm, while the rest began a thorough search, all keeping abreast, with lanterns.
I dared not go below, I dared not leave the helm, so here all night I stayed, and in the dimness of the night I saw it, Him
Larboard your helm," cried the captain to the steersman.
Ships have no ears, I repeat, though, indeed, I think I have known ships who really seemed to have had eyes, or else I cannot understand on what ground a certain 1,000-ton barque of my acquaintance on one particular occasion refused to answer her helm, thereby saving a frightful smash to two ships and to a very good man's reputation.
The women are equally expert with the men in managing the canoe, and generally take the helm.
Evidently they thought they were witnessing an exhibition of poor seamanship, and they yelled their warnings to the tug to reduce speed and throw the helm hard to port.
I think you may have no need of fear on that score," spoke Mary, "for Norman of Torn offered no violence to any woman within the wall of Stutevill, and when one of his men laid a heavy hand upon me, it was the great outlaw himself who struck the fellow such a blow with his mailed hand as to crack the ruffian's helm, saying at the time, 'Know you, fellow, Norman of Torn does not war upon women?
The charioteer took first then his helm, ridged like a board, four-cornered.
It was very pleasant, when I stayed late in town, to launch myself into the night, especially if it was dark and tempestuous, and set sail from some bright village parlor or lecture room, with a bag of rye or Indian meal upon my shoulder, for my snug harbor in the woods, having made all tight without and withdrawn under hatches with a merry crew of thoughts, leaving only my outer man at the helm, or even tying up the helm when it was plain sailing.
But one living creature was on deck--the man at the helm, dozing peaceably with his arm over the useless tiller.
The impetuosity of my ad- vent made the man at the helm start slightly.
All had helms on their heads, and lances and shields in their hands; they increased in numbers; and when Gerda had finished the Lord's Prayer, she was surrounded by a whole legion.