hemiparasite


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hemiparasite

[¦he·mē′par·ə‚sīt]
(ecology)
A parasite capable of a saprophytic existence, especially certain parasitic plants containing some chlorophyll. Also known as semiparasite.
References in periodicals archive ?
capitata may not only conduct water but also absorb nutrients from the host, therefore, supporting the suggestion of Hawksworth and Wiens [13] that the photosynthate from hemiparasites is scarcely used as the parasites depend mostly on the nutrients absorbed from the host.
Host preference of the federally endangered hemiparasite Schwalbea americana L.
Host selectivity and the mediation of competition by the root hemiparasite Rhinanthus minor.
Most root hemiparasites can form haustoria on a majority of the plant species around them, including members of their own species (Heckard 1962, Piehl 1963).
Relative to three epiphytes recorded, only one was determined concerning the dispersal mode (zoochoric), and the single registered hemiparasite, Psittacanthus dichrous Mart.
A study of the root hemiparasite Rhinanthus minor led to similar conclusions (Gibson and Watkinson 1992).
We studied this relationship with Agrostis capillaris, a perennial grass, and Rhinanthus serotinus, an annual facultative root hemiparasite, both plant species common in different types of grassland vegetation.
The genus is characterized by the following traits: stem hemiparasites rarely with long epicortical roots; bisexual flowers ultimately arranged in dichasia, often with the central flower aborted, and subtended by a main bract and two lateral bracteoles (Suaza-Gaviria et al.
Epiphytes and hemiparasites were excluded from the biogeographical matrices.
Striga species, so-called witchweeds, are obligate root hemiparasites belonging to the Orobanchaceae, and represent the biggest weed threat to agriculture of sub-Saharan Africa.
"Sandalwood didn't work for us in our manicured environment," says Fernandes, "because they are hemiparasites [trees that get part of their food from parasitism] and need more hosts than we had for them.