hemocoel


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hemocoel

[′hē·mə‚sēl]
(invertebrate zoology)
An expanded portion of the blood system in arthropods that replaces a portion of the coelom.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The epithelial cells basally are in contact with the hemocoel while the cells apices are covered by a thin cuticle measuring about 1.5 [micro]m in thickness (Fig.
magna molting, growth and reproductive functions modulate the quantity and fate of storage lipids, mainly triacylglycerols located in spherical lipid droplets inside fat cells scattered throughout the animal hemocoel (Tessier and Goulden 1982; Zaffagini and Zeni 1986).
The process of host colonization initiates after penetration, with the penetrating hyphae becoming thicker and ramify within the tegument and the hemocoel of the insect, forming blastospores.
During normal forward ventilation of gills by the scaphognathites, the lamellae tend to be inflated by a small positive transmural pressure, which is the difference between the above-ambient pressure in the lamellar hemocoel and subambient mean pressure in the branchial chamber in crab.
Innate immunity might confer a selective advantage in an insect that routinely introduces surface bacteria into the hemocoel of both sexes and immature stages by traumatic insemination.
In invertebrates, increased serotonin shows an increase in aggression [134] since infusion of 5-HT in the hemocoel cavity of the crayfish Astacus astacus caused the animal to fight longer in an encounter [6,135].
Using sperm as a source of nutrients is not unheard of in insects; e.g., hemocoel insemination in bedbugs is presumed to nourish the female (Hinn 1999).
rams, procercoids inhabit the hemocoel of a cyclopoid copepod and the definitive host can be infected during its larval stage either by swallowing an infected copepod or as an adult by accidentally swallowing an infected intermediate host (Thomas 1937b; Jarroll 1979; 1980).
Fate of some culture flagellates in the hemocoel of Rhodnius prolixus.
The genetic basis can include a single gene with large effect for the appeal of parasite eggs to feeding beetles or the ability of parasite eggs to penetrate the gut lining and move into the hemocoel. Polymorphism in the stock population for a simple genetic basis could result in fixed allelic differences among the inbred lineages yielding significant among-lineage variation and some significant differences from the ancestral population.
After invading the hemocoel of the host insect these nematodes release a toxin that inhibits the insect immune system, and then release bacterial symbionts from their intestine.
Species of Ascarops, Gongylonema and Physocephalus, superfamily Spiruroidea, are generally recognized as parasites of birds and mammals (Anderson, 1992), with initial development occurring in the hemocoel of an insect intermediate host.