hemosiderosis


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Related to hemosiderosis: hemochromatosis

hemosiderosis

[‚hē·mō‚sid·ə′rō·səs]
(physiology)
Deposition of hemosiderin in body tissues without tissue damage, reflecting an increase in body iron stores.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Ruol, "Renal hemosiderosis in the hemolytic anemias: diagnosis by means of needle biopsy," Blood, vol.
Microscopically, there was lymphoid hyperplasia in the spleen and systemic hemosiderosis. These findings are similar to those described by HERRERA et al.
Unilateral or bilateral 3- to 10-mm fluffy centrilobular lung nodules with variably perceptible high attenuation are a common manifestation of metastatic calcification (Figure 10) and may resemble hemosiderosis. These nodules can densely calcify or densely consolidate.
Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis in infants (IPHI) first arose as an issue in Greater Cleveland.
Deferasirox, an orally administered iron chelating agent taken once a day, was unanimously backed for approval by the Food and Drug Administration's Blood Products Advisory Panel for treating transfusional hemosiderosis. At a meeting, all 14 panel members supported approval for adults and children ages 6 and older.
Exclusion criteria included the following: (a) serum liver enzyme (aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) activities above the upper limits of the reference intervals; (b) increased serum creatinine; (c) previous acute major cardiovascular event; (d) acute illnesses and current evidence of acute or chronic inflammatory or infectious diseases; (e) history of transfusion or iron or vitamin therapies in the previous 5 years; (fl history of disturbances in iron balance (e.g., hemosiderosis from any cause, atransferrinemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, iron deficiency); and (S) mental illness rendering the person unable to understand the nature, scope, and possible consequences of the study.
Several reports also suggest that severe illnesses may be attributed to exposures to mycotoxins, including organic dust toxic syndrome and pulmonary hemosiderosis, although causation has not yet been definitively established (CDC, 2000; Etzel et al., 1998; Lecours, Laviolette, & Cormier, 1986; Malmberg, 1990; Malmberg, Rask-Andersen, Lundholm, & Palmgren, 1990; Montana, Etzel, Allan, Horgan, & Dearborn, 1997; Richerson, 1990; Yoshida, Masayuki, & Shukuro, 1989; Von Essen, Robbins, Thompson, & Rennard, 1990).
Some studies suggest that severe health effects such as pulmonary hemosiderosis, bleeding in the lungs, can occur in infants younger than six months old, according to the New York City Department.
Granted, there are cases of juvenile hemosiderosis, and there are inherited conditions that can result in iron overload in children, such as [beta]-thalassemia.