hepatotoxin

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hepatotoxin

[¦hep·əd·ō′täk·sən]
(pharmacology)
An agent capable of damaging the liver.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compared with 2 drugs mentioned above, diclofenac had the highest proportion of hepatotoxic events which ranged from 0.015 to 4.3 (x[10.sup.-2]).
Also avoidance of hepatotoxic drugs should be practiced in all febrile patients in areas where dengue is endemic so that liver damage is not further aggravated if the patient has dengue infection.
To address the complexity of DILI in humans, we also incorporated hepatotoxic related clinical manifestations in our analysis.
In animal models, it was observed that glutathione depletion and covalent binding of NAPQI were insufficient to cause hepatocyte death with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen, but JNK was required to actively induce programmed necrosis (Garcie-Cortes et al.
Introduction: Unsaturated pyrrolizidine alkaloids have long been considered hepatotoxic and potentially carcinogenic, and herbs containing them are banned from use in Australia.
We hypothesized that fluconazole is more hepatotoxic than ketoconazole based on histological examination.
Currently, most available ALF models can be divided into two main categories: hepatotoxic drug models and surgical models.
Seven different articles attributed Gardenia's component geniposide to its hepatotoxic effect [19-25].
The former, which includes acetaminophen, is often dose-dependent with predictable liver injury at hepatotoxic doses [11,15].
With a suspected DILI, withdraw of the antituberculosis drugs was determined and other causes of liver injury were excluded, such as viral hepatitis, concomitant HIV infection, alcohol consumption, and the use of other hepatotoxic offenders.
Male Wistar rats weighing 210-220 g were divided randomly into four groups (n = 6): (1) normal rats that received 30% C[Cl.sub.4] in olive oil (1 mL/kg body wt i.p) every 72 hours for a period of 10 days (hepatotoxic group); (2) C[Cl.sub.4] hepatotoxic induced rats that received 100 mg/kg dill extract for 10 days; (3) C[Cl.sub.4]-induced hepatotoxic rats that received 300 mg/kg dill extract for 10 days; (4) normal rats that received distilled water (1 mL/kg body wt) orally for 10 days [16].