heptarchy


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heptarchy

heptarchy (hĕpˈtärkē) [Gr.,=seven-kingdom], name traditionally applied to the kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England in the period prior to the Danish conquests of the 9th cent. The term was probably first used by 16th-century writers who believed that in those early years England was divided into seven kingdoms—Northumbria, East Anglia, Mercia, Essex, Sussex, Wessex, and Kent. Actually the political and geographical divisions were neither so orderly nor permanent. At one time (c.600) there appear to have been as many as 12 independent states, but the number of kingdoms, their boundaries, and their political status shifted constantly throughout this period.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For the period, historians recognize seven main Anglo-Saxon realms, the heptarchy, but it is clear from Bede's account there are more numerous divisions, at least thirty.
England in the time of the Heptarchy, the water enclosing, Angles or Isle Land covered by water.
In Britain the wars of Alfred the Great and of the Plantagenet and Tudor monarchs forged the heptarchy into England and the British Isles into the United Kingdom.
In response to the question about who was the first King: England, in the 9th Century, had seven kingdoms (the Heptarchy) - Kent, Sussex, Essex, East Anglia, Mercia, Northumbria and Wessex.
IN MAY 1993 THE RACING yacht Heptarchy, with a crew of 10, fouled its propeller in a fishing net while trying to get into port in Cornwall, England.
Dividing England into states is not an entirely new thing, HG Wells suggested this at the turn of the 20th century and in 1905, W Saunders, a Fabian, suggested that an English heptarchy, consisting of seven provinces, be set up.
However, Alfred adopted a cut-and-paste approach, substituting a passage on the downfall of the Britons taken verbatim from Bede's eighth-century history of the English church, followed by Geoffrey of Monmouth's reflections on the degeneracy of the Welsh, then beginning his next chapter with the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy. The author of the Prose Brut was subtler and more radical, omitting all reference to the Britons or the Welsh.
In terms of focalization Geography brings us full circle from the Wessex of the Heptarchy through the intervening centuries, via such denizens as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Wilkie Collins, and even Elizabeth Gaskell, right up to Hardy's own creative nativity.
For what purpose is the rodent poison warfarin Quiz of the Day ANSWERS: 1 Hispaniola; 2 The language Esperanto; 3 To prevent blood clotting; 4 Chimpanzees; 5 The Heptarchy; 6 The Baltic; 7 Cellini; 8 Ginger; 9 Miss Potter; 10 Loaded dice.