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Hera

(hĭr`ə, hēr`ə), in Greek religion and mythology, queen of the Olympian gods, daughter of Kronos and Rhea. She was the wife and sister of Zeus and the mother of Ares and Hephaestus. A jealous wife, she fought constantly with Zeus and plagued his mistresses and children. She was the protectress of women, presiding over marriage and childbirth, and frequently punished offending husbands. A powerful divinity, Hera was worshiped in all parts of Greece, especially at Argos and Salmos, where she had splendid temples. She is usually represented as a majestic figure, fully draped, crowned with a wreath or diadem, and carrying a scepter. Frequently she is associated with the pomegranate, symbol of marital love and fruitfulness. The peacock was sacred to her. The Romans identified Hera with Juno.

Hera

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Hera, asteroid 103 (the 103rd asteroid to be discovered, on September 7, 1868), is approximately 96 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 4.4 years. Hera was named after the Greek goddess of women and childbirth. She was the sister and wife of Zeus, king of the Olympian deities. Hera was the most jealous wife in ancient mythology, and she persecuted both her husband’s lovers and the children of Zeus’s many love affairs. Jacob Schwartz gives the astrological significance of this asteroid as “maintaining the balance between power and justice; issues of rights and partnership dynamics.” According to Martha Lang-Wescott, Hera “illustrates the relationship model of the parents as perceived by the individual—and the way that model is acted out in present roles through assumptions about equality, fidelity and commitment in relationship.” This asteroid’s key phrase is “keeping accounts.”

Sources:

Lang-Wescott, Martha. Asteroids-Mechanics: Ephemerides II. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1990.
Lang-Wescott. Mechanics of the Future: Asteroids. Rev. ed. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1991.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Hera

(Rom. Juno) angry at Zeus’s illicit sexual pleasure. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 563]
See: Anger

Hera

(Rom. Juno) goddess of childbirth. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 59]

Hera

, Here
Greek myth the queen of the Olympian gods and sister and wife of Zeus

HERA

An electron-proton collider at DESY, W. Germany.
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