Herm

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Related to hermae: Hermai

Herm:

see Channel IslandsChannel Islands,
archipelago (2015 est. pop. 164,000), 75 sq mi (194 sq km), 10 mi (16 km) off the coast of Normandy, France, in the English Channel. The main islands are Jersey, Guernsey, Alderney, and Sark, and there are several smaller islands, including Herm, Jethou, and
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, British dependency.

herm

(hûrm), in 6th-century Greek art, vertical pillar surmounted by a bearded human head and often having a phallus below. These structures were considered sacred to Hermes. They were placed on street corners in Athens and used outside the city as milestones. By the end of the Hellenistic era the form was employed for portraiture.

Herm

A rectangular post, usually of stone, tapering downward, surmounted by a bust of Hermes or other divinity or by a human head.

Herm

 

a tetrahedral pillar originally topped by the sculptured head of the god Hermes (hence the name) and later of other gods; from the fifth century B.C. with portraits of statesmen, philosophers, and other important men. Herms served as landmarks and road signs. In the 16th century they became a popular type of decorative and park sculpture.

REFERENCE

Lullies, R. Die Typen der griechischen Herme. Königsberg, 1931.

herm

herm
A rectangular post, usually of stone and tapering downward, surmounted by a bust of Hermes or other divinity, or by a human head.
References in periodicals archive ?
They'd sent the mayor to desecrate my hermae with gas station jerseys; what else were people like that capable of?
"There is surely a kind of Athenian atrocity which has no parallel in Sparta: the Athenians' savage rage against each other after the mutilation of the Hermae and the profanation of the mysteries." (69) Strauss expresses Thucydides' final view as follows: "Sparta and Athens were worthy antagonists not only because they were the most powerful Greek cities but because each was in its own way of outstanding nobility." (70) Despite the severe limitations placed on them by fear and the civil strife that results from that fear, the Athenians are noble because they crave honor and that craving leads to rare gestures of humanity that would be inconceivable to a Spartan.
For example, those charged with mutilation of the Hermae or profanation of the mysteries, if the arrest was made in Athens, were executed, their property confiscated and sold.
71, lists as New Testament 'ecclesiastical' books libellus qui dicitur Pastoris sive Hermae, et is qui appellatur Duae viae, vel Iudicium secundum Petrum; Zahn, ii.I, 243, n.
In contrast to this the omens for the Athenian voyage are much more threatening, with the mutilation of the Hermae the night before departure (6.27-9).(30) This is perceived both as a danger to the democracy and as a (bad) omen for the departure of the expedition ([GREEK TEXT NO REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] ...