hermit

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Related to hermitic: hermetic, Hermetic seal

hermit

[Gr.,=desert], one who lives in solitude, especially from ascetic motives. Hermits are known in many cultures. Permanent solitude was common in ancient Christian asceticismasceticism
, rejection of bodily pleasures through sustained self-denial and self-mortification, with the objective of strengthening spiritual life. Asceticism has been common in most major world religions, including Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity: all of
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; St. AnthonyAnthony, Saint
, 251?–c.350, Egyptian hermit, called St. Anthony of Egypt and St. Anthony the Abbot. At the age of 20 he gave away his large inheritance and became a hermit.
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 of Egypt and St. Simeon StylitesSimeon Stylites, Saint
[Gr.,= of a pillar], d. 459?, Syrian hermit. He lived for more than 35 years on a small platform on top of a high pillar. He had many imitators (called stylites) and gained the reverence of the whole Christian world. Feast: Jan. 5.
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 were noted hermits. Many extreme Franciscans (Spirituals) of the 13th and the 14th cent. were hermits, among them Pope St. Celestine. In the East the hermit, or eremetical, life was widely held to be the more perfect form of monasticismmonasticism
, form of religious life, usually conducted in a community under a common rule. Monastic life is bound by ascetical practices expressed typically in the vows of celibacy, poverty, and obedience, called the evangelical counsels.
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 and was open only to those who had first passed years in a monastic community. Monasticism in the West developed along the less rigorous communal lines; the CarthusiansCarthusians
, small order of monks of the Roman Catholic Church [Lat. abbr.,=O. Cart.]. It was established by St. Bruno at La Grande Chartreuse (see Chartreuse, Grande) in France in 1084.
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 are well-known exceptions. The hermit or anchorite of the ancient church lived in the desert, commonly walled up in a cell with only a window. In medieval Europe the cell usually connected with a church. The Ancren RiwleAncren Riwle
or Ancrene Wisse
[Mid. Eng.,=anchoresses' rule], English tract written c.1200 by an anonymous English churchman for the instruction of three young ladies about to become religious recluses.
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 was written for English anchoresses. Juliana of NorwichJuliana of Norwich
, d. c.1443, English religious writer, an anchoress, or hermit, of Norwich called Mother (or Dame) Juliana or Julian. Her work, completed c.1393, Revelations of Divine Love, is an expression of mystical fervor in the form of 16 visions of Jesus.
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 was a famous English anchoress.

hermit

one of the early Christian recluses
References in periodicals archive ?
(21) Whereas Huang chooses to live a hermitic life, showing a kind of transcendental attitude, Hong decides to pioneer a new life with a challenging and courageous spirit.
Since Bishop Augustine historically had lived with his canons in Hippo Regius, but never as an anchorite, the Hermits had an especially weak hold on their eponymous "founder." Several of the essays explore the uses of art by the Hermits to emphasize their rootedness in Augustine and the superiority of the hermitic tradition in general.
According to a report in Discovery News, the study determines that mammals which regularly hunker down, hibernate, or otherwise hide from the world, are better at weathering environmental change than are less hermitic species.
We taste three green teas, including Lu Shan Clouds & Mist, which Yu tells me is grown on an isolated, extremely beautiful mountain inhabited by hermitic Taoist monks--an area that gets blinding fog for 265 days of the year.
Hatomura (Yuriko Ishida) to coax hermitic 17-year-old genius Saraka (Mitsuki Tanimura)--who invented the Mugen, Tokyo's rollercoaster-shaped particle accelerator--out of her computer cave and into the university.
for Antonio Cabrera Four drops of oil --on a single, hermitic piece of bread, or over the obsequious heart of a ripe sacrificial tomato-- instruct us with their nakedness, with their utter absence of advice.
Hoping to find inspiration, Isabel visits a hermitic mystic and is immediately put into a sleeping state.
Why tolerate this infection of Liberalism by the very "hermitic, paranoid" totalitarian pulsion she railed against earlier in the century when it infected communism and socialism?
Chong said that in 1978, it never crossed anyone's mind that North Korea's hermitic regime could resort to kidnapping foreign citizens.
THPI-4: Is Hermitic Encapsulation of GaAs MMIC Still Required for Space Applications?
Even with all the hype about meetings in cyberspace and working in hermitic isolation, the dissemination of ideas still tends to be a social infection.