Hetaera

(redirected from hetaeras)
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hetaera

 

in ancient Greece, an educated, unmarried woman leading a free, independent way of life. Some hetaerae played a significant role in civic life. Many outstanding political figures, poets, and sculptors gathered in the houses of the hetaerae. The term “hetaera” was also applied to prostitutes.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is this need to please another or a crowd that connects the movie star to the hetaera (626).
[t]he hetaera does not uncover the world, she opens no road to human transcendence: on the contrary, she seeks to take possession of it for her profit; offering herself for the approval of her admirers, she does not disavow this passive femininity that dooms her to man: she endows it with a magic power that allows her to take males into the trap of her presence, and to feed herself on them; she engulfs them with herself in immanence (626).
Such a professional "escapes the hetaera's condition; she can experience true independence" (629).
In this sense, Regina demonstrates the characteristics of Beauvoir's hetaera, while Dulac's power to objectify and eradicate her unique characteristics accords with Beauvoir's description of Hollywood in TSS:
As such, "[t]he greatest misfortune for the hetaera is that not only is her independence the deceptive reverse side of a thousand dependencies, but this very freedom is negative" (630).
Like the hetaera who misguidedly "seeks [in glory] the apotheosis of her narcissism" (632), Regina exemplifies Beauvoir's idea that "the admiration she feels for herself limits the actress's talent in many cases; she deludes herself as to the value of her mere presence to the extent that serious work seems useless to her" (758).