heterochromia


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heterochromia

[‚hed·ə·rō′krō·mē·ə]
(physiology)
A condition in which the two irises of an individual have different colors, or in which one iris has two colors.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Heterochromia is a difference in coloration, usually of the iris but also of hair or skin.
Not only does he have a cleft lip like our 7-year-old son Madden, he also has complete heterochromia iridum, like Madden."
The reduced pigmentation in the eyes was clearly evident from hazel green to light brown and bluish colouration of the iris but no symptom of heterochromia iridis was observed.
PPM may also be accompanied by persistent hyperplastic tunica vasculosa lentis, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, cataract, microphthalmia (BAYON et al., 2002; MITCHELL, 2011), retinal dysplasia (BAYON et al., 2002), iris hypoplasia (MISK et al., 1998; PINARD & BASRUR, 2011), heterochromia iridis (MISK et al., 1998), angle-closure glaucoma caused by pupillary block, or peripheral anterior synechiae (YOUNG et al., 1974).
In addition to heterochromia, the protagonist is anything but sane and rational because he has a multiple personality disorder and talks to himself like a schizophrenic.
Iris heterochromia, dilation lag, anhidrosis, and harlequin sign may concurrently be present [2, 3].
(2) Waardenburg syndrome: Type I, wide bridge of the nose, lateral displacement of the inner canthus, pigmentary disturbance of frontal white blaze of hair, heterochromia iridis, white eye lashes, leukoderma, cochlear deafness, and spina bifida.
The various acral RPD include reticulate acropigmentation of Kitamura, acropigmentation of Dohi, acral melanosis and heterochromia extremitarium.
(5,9,10,11) Accordingly, cases exhibiting typically unilateral, chronic, low-grade anterior chamber reaction with varying degrees of vitreous opacity, widespread small- or medium-sized keratic precipitates (KP) in the corneal epithelium, diffuse iris atrophy and/or heterochromia but without acute exacerbations, posterior synechiae or cystoid macular edema were clinically diagnosed with FUS.
Iris condition was evaluated and abnormalities like peripheral buttonhole iridectomy, iritis, rubeosis, atrophic patches, heterochromia, synechiae, nodules were looked for.
There are two kinds of heterochromia. If it is complete, one iris is a different colour from the other.
[sup][3] considered distinctive ocular symptoms, markedly elevated IOP, acquired iris heterochromia, and the failure of appropriate treatment as indicating an underlying malignancy to secondary glaucoma.