heterocyclic compound

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heterocyclic compound

[‚hed·ə·rō′sī·klik ¦käm‚pau̇nd]
(organic chemistry)
Compound in which the ring structure is a combination of more than one kind of atom; for example, pyridine, C5H5N.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This benefit was vividly seen in two studies showing chlorophyllin's ability to protect against the damage caused by two known DNA-damaging carcinogens: aflatoxins and heterocyclic amines.
On the other hand, the IARC Working Group classified "the consumption of red meat as probably carcinogenic based on limited evidence that the consumption of red meat causes cancers and the strong mechanistic evidence (Group 2A)." Cooking meats can result in the production of mutagens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or heterocyclic amines.
3-Amino-6-([beta]-D-ribofuranosyl)imidazo[4,5-c]pyrazole 125 was synthesized via an N-N bond formation strategy by a mononuclear heterocyclic rearrangement (MHR).
Once the "crispy" hamburger is eaten, the heterocyclic amines potentially could lead to cell malfunction.
"Effect of Beer/Red Wine Marinades on the Formation of Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines in Pan-Fried Beef" Authors: A.
New entries in this category include heterocyclic amines, which are chemicals created in overcooked meats (SN: 4/24/99, p.
Many of the products containing the beta-ketoester pendant group are also candidates for further reactions with compounds such as hydroxylamine or hydrazines to give mixed heterocyclic compounds.
Grilling favorites such as hot dogs and hamburgers leads to the production of cancer-causing chemicals called heterocyclic amines (HAs).
During the cooking, frying, or broiling of meat there is the formation of powerful mutagens identified as heterocyclic aromatic amines.
Dibenzoylmethane (DBM), a structural analogue of curcumin (a bioactive phytochemical present in a widely used spice turmeric) was screened for its inhibitory effect against seven cooked food mutagens (heterocyclic amines): 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (MeIQ), 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-1), 3-amino-1-methyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole (Trp-P-2), 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-6-methyldipyrido[1,2-a:3',2'-d]imidazole (Glu-P-1), in both TA98 and TA100 strains of Salmonella typhimurium using Ames Salmonella/reversion assay in the presence of Aroclor1254-induced rat liver $9 homogenate.
produces high amounts of a group of substances known as heterocyclic amines (HCAs), which are thought to promote cancer growth.
If that isn't enough, carcinogenic compounds called heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are created when meat is cooked at high temperatures.