heterodox

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heterodox

at variance with established, orthodox, or accepted doctrines or beliefs
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This kind of stickiness to organizational beliefs based on economic orthodoxy, rather than heterodoxy, has meant withering of voter confidence in public policy, and in policy recommendations.
If I were running a retailer--and please, don't ever let that happen--I would look up the word "heterodoxy" in the dictionary and if I didn't see a picture of my store next to the definition, I'd make it my word of the year...
The topics also include: alienation, non-violence, heterodoxy, justice, human rights, convergence and struggles for democracy.
The former hints at how much Lollard heterodoxy concerning signs has in common with more contemporary concerns about what constitutes the human as played out in countless zombie and vampire films.
If Bernstein is correct, "What is Political Philosophy?" is Strauss's disguised expression of his discovery and explication of heterodoxy in the writings of the Jewish thinker Maimonides.
Within this picture, there is little place for someone like Marsilio Ficino, whose fascination with Plato and Neoplatonism led him to a heterodoxy that sometimes pushed the limits even in Renaissance Florence.
Salvation through Dissent: Tonghak Heterodoxy and Early Modern Korea.
Schillebeeckx, who received an outpouring of popular support as well as a flood of letters from Catholic and Protestant theologians, eventually was cleared of any charges of "heterodoxy."
His topics include the psychophysical energy of the Way in Daoist thought, the promise and peril of Toegye's neo-Confucian heterodoxy, the empathetic plurisingularity of the great ultimate in Nongmun's thought, and a neo-Confucian trinity in conversation with Deleuze and Keller.
Taborites were the only heterodoxy to successfully, if only temporarily, establish its own state within Christendom before the Lutheran reform.